Archive | March 2017

Thank You, JBJS Reviewers

During the 2017 AAOS Annual Meeting in San Diego next week, JBJS will formally recognize its 30 Elite Reviewers.

In the days leading up to the Annual Meeting, we would like to profile and thank some of our additional outstanding reviewers. Today, let’s meet Wudbhav Sankar and Leon Benson:

Sankar

 

Wudbhav Sankar, MD
Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia

 

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Contributing to our-peer reviewed process for improving
understanding and treatment of msk disorders.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Nights and weekends! It’s a sacrifice like any other.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
Pivotal as the highest impact factor and most widely read ortho
journal. It’s the standard.

 

Dr.  Leon Benson

 

Leon Benson, MD
University of Chicago

 

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The intellectual challenge.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I take my laptop with me everywhere.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS will continue to be both the leading edge as well as the
foundation of contemporary orthopaedic knowledge for our
patients.

JBJS/JOSPT Webinar–Improving ACL Reconstruction Outcomes

April 4 Webinar Speakers

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common and predominantly successful surgical intervention.  But are there any specific preoperative patient characteristics or intraoperative surgical decisions that lead to better or worse outcomes? And can understanding brain function changes of patients after ACL reconstruction reveal how to improve postsurgical rehabilitation to further enhance outcomes?

These intriguing and clinically applicable questions will be addressed on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at 8:00 PM EDT during a complimentary* LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) and the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

  • JBJS co-author Kurt Spindler, MD, will discuss findings that identified baseline patient characteristics and intraoperative choices that predicted higher and lower SF-36 Physical Component scores after ACL reconstruction.
  • JOSPT co-author Dustin Grooms, PhD, will share recently published results of a study that employed functional MRI to investigate brain-activation differences between patients who did and did not undergo ACL reconstruction.

Moderated by Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT, a leading authority on rehabilitation of sports injuries, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators Eric McCarty, MD, and Karin Silbernagel, PT, PhD. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Seats are limited, so Register Now.

* This webinar is complimentary for those who attend the event live.

Thank You, JBJS Reviewers

During the 2017 AAOS Annual Meeting in San Diego next week, JBJS will formally recognize its 30 Elite Reviewers.

In the days leading up to the Annual Meeting, we would like to profile and thank some of our additional outstanding reviewers. Today, let’s meet John L. Eady and William M. Ricci:

Dr. John Easy

 

John L Eady, MD
Dorn VA Hospital,
Columbia, SC

 

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The trust placed in my reviewing abilities by the editors of JBJS as
well as the authors who submit their works for consideration for
publication.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
One doesn’t “find” the time to do the reviews. The time has to be set
aside and dedicated to doing the review as soon as an invitation to
review is received.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
It will become even more labor-intensive to achieve the core goals of
selecting well-written, evidence-based articles for publication as the
age of instant, unsubstantiated messaging proliferates. The
leadership of JBJS will need skills unheard of presently to create
new methods which insure the continued selection of core
knowledge that shapes the direction of value-based orthopaedics.

Dr. William M. Ricci RicciW_300

 

William M. Ricci, MD
Washington University,
St. Louis

 

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Serving the orthopaedic community to ensure good research is
published in its best form.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Just like anything else, if something is a priority, you make time
for it.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS provides the orthopaedic community an opportunity to see
what peers believe is important in the field.

Thank You, JBJS Reviewers

During the 2017 AAOS Annual Meeting in San Diego next week, JBJS will formally recognize its 30 Elite Reviewers.

In the days leading up to the Annual Meeting, we would like to profile and thank some of our additional outstanding reviewers. Today, let’s meet Winston J. Warme and A. Seth Greenwald:

Dr. Winston-Warme-5oKB_200px

Winston J. Warme, MD
University of Washington

 

 

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
I enjoy being a part of the peer-review process at the flagship
orthopaedic journal.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
It is a priority, so I make time to do it.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
With forward thinking Editors-in-Chief like Dr. Swiontkowski, and top
shelf contributors, JBJS will continue to be The Journal to read, with
cutting-edge articles and thoughtful editorials.

 

Dr. W14 Greenwald - email.jpg

A. Seth Greenwald,
D. Phil. (Oxon)
Orthopaedic Research
Laboratories


What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The opportunity to use a lifetime of one’s orthopaedic learning to address contemporary clinical submissions.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I think it important enough to allocate both personal and professional
time to stay abreast of the state-of-the-art as well as contribute my
knowledge and background in its evaluation.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
I believe the journal’s role in shaping the future of orthopaedics is the
reporting of contemporary clinical outcomes associated with
musculoskeletal problems, as well as maintaining its presence as a
focus of education for surgical practitioners. The journal should strive
to establish its presence as the reporter of evolving practices and the
financial structures, both in the private and public sectors, that
facilitate healthcare for the American people.

Total Joint Arthroplasty: Does One Lead to Another?

TJA and Second TJA.jpegAn estimated 7 million people living in the US have undergone a total joint arthroplasty (TJA), and the demand for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) will almost certainly increase during the next 15 years.  But how many people can expect to have an additional TJA after having a first one?

That’s the question Sanders et al. address in their historical cohort study, published in the March 1, 2017 edition of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. They followed more than 4,000 patients who underwent either THA or TKA between 1969 and 2008 to assess the likelihood of those patients undergoing a subsequent, non-revision TJA.

Here’s what they found:

  • Twenty years after an initial THA, the likelihood of a contralateral hip replacement was 29%.
  • Ten years after an initial THA, the likelihood of a contralateral knee replacement was 6%, and the likelihood of an ipsilateral knee replacement was 2% at 20 years.
  • Twenty years after an initial TKA, the likelihood of a contralateral knee replacement was 45%.
  • After an initial TKA, the likelihood of a contralateral hip replacement was 3% at 20 years, and the likelihood of an ipsilateral hip replacement was 2% at 20 years.

In those undergoing an initial THA, younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral hip replacement, and in those undergoing an initial TKA, older age was a predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral hip replacement.

The authors conclude that “patients undergoing [THA] or [TKA] can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of initial arthroplasty.” They caution, however, that these findings may not be generalizable to populations with more racial or socioeconomic diversity than the predominantly Caucasian population they studied.

Thank You, JBJS Reviewers

During the 2017 AAOS Annual Meeting in San Diego next week, JBJS will formally recognize its 30 Elite Reviewers.

In the days leading up to the Annual Meeting, we would like to profile and thank some of our additional outstanding reviewers. Today, let’s meet Kodali Silva R.K. Prasad and Alastair Younger:

Prasad
Kodali Silva R. K. Prasad, MD
Price Charles Hospital

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
JBJS has evolved a uniquely rigorous dual peer review system with graded
content review and methodological review coupled with editorial supervision, a formidable combination to pre-empt system failure and ensure sustained excellence. While conceding that a perfect study is probably a  virtually impossible entity, I believe that this stringent dual review system with editorial control constitutes an optimal approach toward perfection. JBJS’ stable of journals offer a comprehensive range of publications, unlikely to be replicated in current orthopaedic literature. Consistently high impact factor of JBJS, as yet unrivalled among general orthopaedic journals, is a testament to continuous publication of significant scientific research and original contributions to orthopaedic literature.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I view the review process as a medium for wider contribution to the
progress of trauma and orthopaedic surgery and momentum of creative
impetus for future achievement. I consider it a duty for present and future
generations and make time outside my clinical commitments.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS plays a vital role to inspire definition of the current practice for
excellence and drive the future direction of the clinical landscape in trauma and orthopaedic surgery.

 

Dr. Alastair Younger
Alastair Younger, MD
University of British Columbia

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Reviewing journal articles makes me read the article in depth to
understand the thoughts of the authors. It compels me to remain
current in publications. It is a way of giving back to the orthopaedic
community by assisting other authors in their publications. It helps
me and my co-authors write better papers. Reviewing keeps me
curious and asking questions about how can we help patients better.

How do you find time to review for JBJS?
The reviewing process takes less time with experience. The critical
points or lack of them become apparent. However, like most of my
academic activities the time is found between cases, or at nights and
weekends. Like all other academic activities, it is the desire to do it
that makes you find the time.

What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS remains the premier journal for peer-reviewed orthopaedic
publications. JBJS and orthopaedics will be challenged as our field
becomes more sub-specialized and as we try to keep up with the ever
increasing knowledge in the field. JBJS and the physicians involved will play a major role in leading the future.

Coming in 2017: JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+

JBJS, Inc., is pleased to announce the development of JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+.

Using research-proven, state-of-the-art adaptive learning technology developed by Area9 and employed by NEJM Knowledge+, JBJS Clinical Classroom will provide orthopaedic surgeons with a personalized learning experience at any stage in their career.

Users will learn by answering case-based, short-form, and fill-in-the-blank questions based on JBJS gold-standard content, enhanced  by technology that continuously adapts to learners’ goals, pace, and knowledge gaps.

JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ will be available before the end of 2017.

JBJS Editor’s Choice: Fracture-Care Progress in the Developing World

IM Nail Femur for O'Buzz.jpegIn the March 1, 2017 edition of The Journal, Eliezer et al. report on their experience managing femoral fractures in a major treatment center in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, one of many low-resource locations around the world.

The authors tracked one-year outcomes for 331 femoral fractures in 329 patients. The vast majority of those fractures were treated with intramedullary nails, with open reduction and without intraoperative imaging. The actual reoperation rate for nails was 3.4%, with infection being the most common reason for reoperation.

Eliezer et al. also found that the factors most strongly associated with reoperation were proximal fractures with varus coronal alignment, small nail diameter (8 mm vs larger diameters), and a Winquist type-3 fracture pattern (comminution that included 50% to 75% of the femoral shaft).

Road-traffic accidents are the major cause of disability and loss of work productivity in the developing world among the young, economically productive segments of society. Through the support of organizations like SIGN Fracture Care International, local surgeons in low-resource countries have been able to treat patients who’ve sustained diaphyseal long bone fractures safely and with good functional outcomes. Carefully conducted follow-up studies such as this one give data-driven reassurance to everyone who supports these efforts that surgery can be safely conducted with good patient outcomes.

Performing intramedullary fixation allows early weight bearing and joint motion to limit muscle atrophy and joint stiffness. As long as we can be assured that these procedures have acceptably low rates of reoperation and patient morbidity, we can more confidently encourage the expansion of these programs in the developing world. Organizations like SIGN deserve our support in this regard.

Marc Swiontkowski, MD
JBJS Editor-in-Chief

March 2017 Article Exchange with JOSPT

JOSPT_Article_Exchange_Logo.pngIn 2015, JBJS launched an“article exchange” collaboration with the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) to support multidisciplinary integration, continuity of care, and excellent patient outcomes in orthopaedics and sports medicine.

During the month of March 2017, JBJS and OrthoBuzz readers will have access to the JOSPT article titled “The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Versus Surgery on Self-reported Function, Cervical Range of Motion, and Pinch Grip Force in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.”

In that clinical trial of 100 women with carpal tunnel syndrome randomized to receive either manual therapy or endoscopic decompression/release, researchers found that both interventions had similar outcomes in self-reported function and pinch-tip grip force at 3, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. However, at 1 month, there were significant between-group differences in favor of manual therapy. No changes in cervical range of motion were observed after either manual therapy or surgery at any time point.

New Knee Content from JBJS

knee-spotlight-image.pngThe recently launched JBJS Knee Spotlight offers highly relevant and potentially practice-changing knee content from the most trusted source of orthopaedic information.

Here are the five JBJS articles to which you will have full-text access through the Knee Spotlight during the month of March 2017:

  • Improved Accuracy of Component Positioning with Robotic-Assisted Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Data from a Prospective, Randomized Controlled Study
  • The Effect of Timing of Manipulation Under Anesthesia to Improve Range of Motion and Functional Outcomes Following Total Knee Arthroplasty
  • Anatomic Single-Bundle ACL Reconstruction Is Possible with Use of the Modified Transtibial Technique: A Comparison with the Anteromedial Transportal Technique
  • Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation in the Knee: Mid-Term to Long-Term Results
  • Outcomes of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty After Aseptic Revision to Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Comparative Study of 768 TKAs and 578 UKAs Revised to TKAs from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (1994 to 2011)

Knee studies offered on the JBJS Knee Spotlight will be updated monthly, so check the site often.

Visit the JBJS Knee Spotlight website today.