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JBJS Unveils Reimagined Website

Hub_Homepage-2An authoritative source for clinically useful orthopaedic information for more than 125 years, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) has launched an entirely reengineered website—jbjs.org. This superior online orthopaedic experience—fully optimized for mobile devices—speeds users to targeted content across all six JBJS journals. With a more robust search engine and subspecialty collections, the new jbjs.org delivers practice-specific research results for journal articles, videos, images, webinars, podcasts, and CME activities—all with a single click.

Complimentary access to the new jbjs.org is available until December 31, 2017.

The new website also enhances the capacity of “My JBJS,” where users can store and organize content they have bookmarked. In addition, the site offers clearly organized direct links to JBJS CME material that is related to the user’s search query.

The new jbjs.org also features Clinical Summaries, 300- to 400-word “mini-reviews” of the latest clinical findings pertaining to 100 of the most common orthopaedic conditions. Each Clinical Summary is accompanied by direct links to the most relevant, highly cited articles in JBJS and other peer-reviewed orthopaedic and general-medicine journals. “We believe that Clinical Summaries represent a uniquely useful and evidence-based contribution to orthopaedic practice and the review process in orthopaedic surgery—and that they will improve patient care and enhance professional satisfaction,” said JBJS Editor-in-Chief Marc Swiontkowski, MD.

“The new jbjs.org gives us a unique publishing platform that allows the physician to control the experience,” said Paul Sandford, Chief Executive Officer at JBJS. “All digital content resources—including articles, videos, images, and more—can now be easily located and utilized through a proprietary search feature, subspecialty collections, and Clinical Summaries. This application will open the door for new developments and expand our presence and impact with orthopaedists both in the US and globally.”

For more information about the entirely new jbjs.org, click here.

More Efficient Orthopaedic Education Needed

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The October 4, 2017 issue of JBJS contains another in a series of “What’s Important” personal essays from orthopaedic clinicians. This “What’s Important” article comes from Drs. Peter Scoles and Shepard Hurwitz.

The authors suggest that integration of medical school curricula with the first year of postgraduate training is a practical approach to improving efficiency and reducing costs to both doctors in training and the academic medical centers that help train them. In explaining specific ways to change the paradigm for training orthopaedic surgeons, the authors conclude that an integrative approach would accelerate the process for qualified candidates, while lowering costs and ensuring adequate training opportunities for all.

If you would like JBJS to consider your “What’s Important” story for publication, please submit a manuscript via Editorial Manager. When asked to select an article type, please choose Orthopaedic Forum and include “What’s Important:” at the beginning of the title.

Because they are personal in nature, “What’s Important” submissions will not be subject to the usual stringent JBJS peer-review process. Instead, they will be reviewed by the Editor-in-Chief, who will correspond with the author if revisions are necessary and make the final decision regarding acceptance.

Webinar—When Great Surgeons Have Challenging Behaviors

Oct Webinar Speakers
Sometimes the most talented, skilled physicians with whom you work are also prone to displaying challenging behaviors. Often, these physicians are not cognizant of how their colleagues perceive them. So how can you—as the supervisor, friend, and/or peer of such clinicians—help ensure that patients continue to benefit from their clinical and surgical gifts without behavioral difficulties diminishing their contributions?

On Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 8:00 pm EDT, the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) will host a complimentary webinar that will deliver practical and effective methods you can use to help physicians who are clinically outstanding, but behaviorally difficult, start to make remedial changes.

The presentations about how to be helpful to such colleagues will be led by:

  • Gerald Hickson, senior VP for Quality,Safety, and Risk Prevention at Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • William Hopkinson, professor of orthopaedic surgery at Loyola Medicine
  • George Russell, professor and chair of orthopaedic traumatology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center

Moderated by Dr. Douglas Lundy, orthopaedic trauma surgeon at Resurgens Orthopaedics, this webinar will include a 15-minute live Q&A session during which attendees can ask questions of the panelists.

Seats are limited, so register now!

Webinar—Helping Clinically Excellent Colleagues Who Have Challenging Behaviors

Sometimes the most talented, skilled physicians with whom you work are also prone to displaying challenging behaviors. Often, these physicians are not cognizant of how their colleagues perceive them, so how can you—as the supervisor, friend, and/or peer of such clinicians—help ensure that patients continue to benefit from their clinical and surgical gifts without behavioral difficulties diminishing their contributions?

On Thursday, October 26, 2017 at 8:00 pm EDT, the American Orthopaedic Association (AOA) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) will host a complimentary webinar that will deliver practical and effective methods you can use to help physicians who are clinically outstanding, but behaviorally difficult, start to make remedial changes.

speaker pic from oct webinar

The presentations about how to be helpful to such colleagues will be led by:

  • Gerald Hickson, senior VP for Quality, Safety, and Risk Prevention at Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • William Hopkinson, professor of orthopaedic surgery at Loyola Medicine
  • George Russell, professor and chair of orthopaedic traumatology at the University of Mississippi Medical Center

Moderated by Dr. Douglas Lundy, orthopaedic trauma surgeon at Resurgens Orthopaedics, this webinar will include a 15-minute live Q&A session during which attendees can ask questions of the panelists.

Seats are limited, so register now!

JBJS/JOSPT Webinar–Treating Ankle Sprains and Instability

Webinar Lineup

Ankle sprain is a common musculoskeletal injury throughout the world, affecting tens of thousands of patients daily. What treatments for lateral inversion ankle injury are most effective? When is a wait-and-see approach more beneficial than a training program, and functional interventions more appropriate than surgical treatment? What surgical interventions yield better outcomes for function and instability compared with conservative treatment, particularly when the calcaneofibular ligament is disrupted, and does one postoperative regimen produce better results than another?

On Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 5:00 PM EDT, these intriguing and clinically applicable questions will be addressed during a complimentary* LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) and the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

 JBJS co-authors Mark E. Easley, MD, and Manuel J. Pellegrini, MD, will discuss findings from a systematic quantification of the stabilizing effects of subtalar joint soft-tissue constraints in a novel cadaveric model.

 JOSPT co-author John M. van Ochten, MD, will share the results of a systematic review of randomized controlled and controlled clinical trials on the effectiveness of treatments for ankle sprains.

Moderated by Dr. Alexej Barg, a leading authority on the foot and ankle and traumatic injuries to the lower extremity, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators J. Chris Coetzee, MD, and Phillip A. Gribble, PhD, ATC, FNATA. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Seats are limited, so Register Now.

* This webinar is complimentary for those who attend the event live and will continue to be available at no charge for 24 hours following its conclusion.

OREF Grants Boost Rate of Future NIH Funding Success

callaghanjjOrthoBuzz occasionally receives posts from guest bloggers. This guest post comes from John J.Callaghan, MD.

On October 2, 1955, Alfred R. Shands Jr and five other visionaries in the field of orthopaedic surgery—Joseph S. Barr, James A. Dickson, Francis M. McKeever, Harold A. Sofield, and Philip D. Wilson—convened in New York City for the first meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. They determined that orthopaedic medicine was changing so dramatically in scope and speed that a new, more scientific basis was needed to address the specialty’s evolution. They believed the research most likely to have an impact on the specialty should be conducted primarily by orthopaedic surgeons, who would also set the research agenda.

They realized that for this model to succeed, orthopaedic surgeons and the orthopaedic industry would have to make a firm commitment to support research grants. They hoped that providing seed money grants to young researchers would give a jump start to careers that might have a great impact on the field of orthopaedics. The goal of OREF was both to support research and the researchers who would make a difference in the future.

The responsibility of any fundraising foundation is to steward donations to accomplish the stated mission of the organization and thereby demonstrate the value of donor contributions to both donors and the organization. In the August 16, 2017 issue of JBJS, Hegde et .al. evaluate the success of OREF grant awardees in garnering subsequent principle-investigator National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants during the period between 1994 and 2014. In addition, they explore the researcher profile of an OREF grantee who successfully obtained NIH support.

The authors report a 22% rate of garnering NIH awards among OREF grant recipients, and a 46% rate for OREF Career Development Grant recipients. Combined MD/PHD recipients had a higher rate of NIH funding, as did grants for basic science projects. Grantees who later received NIH funding had higher scholarly productivity and publication experience. The success rate for subsequent NIH funding was higher among OREF grant recipients than the overall 18% rate for NIH funding success, which includes established investigators.

The findings from this study provide important previously unreported information for young investigators, loyal OREF donors, potential future OREF donors, research mentors and mentees, and the hard-working volunteer fundraisers and grant reviewers for the OREF. The data should encourage all who recognize the importance of innovative research in making orthopaedic surgery what it is today and to ensure continued advancements in the future.

The founding fathers of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation would be proud to know their vision was and continues to be accomplished more than 60 years later. Hats off to these authors for this valuable contribution to our orthopaedic literature and the advancement of orthopaedic research.

John J. Callaghan, MD is professor of orthopaedics, rehabilitation, and biomedical engineering at the University of Iowa and a Past President of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation.

Attention PAs and NPs: JBJS JOPA CME Membership

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Access the most relevant peer-reviewed orthopaedic content, including unlimited CME, by purchasing a 1-year JBJS JOPA CME membership—for the limited-time special rate of $99.

Your JBJS JOPA CME membership includes the following essential ingredients for your professional development and education:

  • New JBJS Reviews CME every week
  • Full access to JBJS Reviews and JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA)
  • Monthly Image Quizzes
  • Annual PA Salary Survey
  • Physical Exam and Injection Video Library

With more than 50 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM available annually* with your membership, you can complete all your CME for under $100.

To obtain the special $99 rate, click here and enter code WHQ834AA at checkout.

*The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. JBJS designates each JBJS Reviews journal-based activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Hi-Value/Hi-Quality CME—Anytime, Anywhere

jbjs_pl_journal_4c_5.pngThe new second-quarter 2017 JBJS Quarterly CME Exam—based on articles published in April, May, and June 2017—is now available.

This course contains 100 assessment questions on topics including Shoulder, Infection, Knee, Pediatrics, Trauma, Hip, General Interest, Sports Medicine, Hand & Wrist, Basic Science, Oncology, Foot & Ankle, Elbow, and Spine.

Selected articles included in the CME Q2 Examination: 

  • Formal Physical Therapy After Total Hip Arthroplasty Is Not Required. A Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Management of ACL Injuries in Children and Adolescents
  • Modular Fluted Tapered Stems in Aseptic Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty
  • The Clinical Outcome of Computer-Navigated Compared with Conventional Knee Arthroplasty in the Same Patients.

This activity is approved for 10 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™ and by ABOS for 10 scored and recorded SAE credits

State-of-the-Art Orthopaedic Learning Tool Coming Soon

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JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ is the only orthopaedic learning tool to interactively present clinical case-based questions, focused feedback, and detailed performance data in a state-of-the-art adaptive learning environment.

JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ fits orthopaedic learning into your practice and specific needs.

To find out more as information becomes available, Click Here.

Watch a video explaining JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+.

Introducing JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+

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JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ is the only orthopaedic learning tool to interactively present clinical case-based questions, focused feedback, and detailed performance data in a state-of-the-art adaptive learning environment.

JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ fits orthopaedic learning into your practice and specific needs.

Learn more here.