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Introducing JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+

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JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ is the only orthopaedic learning tool to interactively present clinical case-based questions, focused feedback, and detailed performance data in a state-of-the-art adaptive learning environment.

JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ fits orthopaedic learning into your practice and specific needs.

Learn more here.

JBJS Elite Reviewers: Latest Update

The JBJS Elite Reviewers Program publicly recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. Reviewers who review 4 or more manuscripts per year, rarely decline an invitation to review a manuscript (responding within 48 hours), and complete highly graded reviews within 1 week are eligible for the program.

Here is a recently updated list of JBJS Elite Reviewers, with 12 new additions marked with asterisks:

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Elite Reviewers receive the following benefits in recognition of their exemplary performance:

      • No submission fees for papers of which the reviewer is the first author (for 12 months)
      • Free CME credits for all reviews
      • Free online access to all JBJS publications
      • Name recognition on the masthead of The Journal

Click here for JBJS Consultant Reviewer Guidelines.
Click here to learn how you can be a better reviewer.

JBJS/JOSPT Webinar–Improving ACL Reconstruction Outcomes

April 4 Webinar Speakers

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common and predominantly successful surgical intervention.  But are there any specific preoperative patient characteristics or intraoperative surgical decisions that lead to better or worse outcomes? And can understanding brain function changes of patients after ACL reconstruction reveal how to improve postsurgical rehabilitation to further enhance outcomes?

These intriguing and clinically applicable questions will be addressed on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at 8:00 PM EDT during a complimentary* LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) and the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

  • JBJS co-author Kurt Spindler, MD, will discuss findings that identified baseline patient characteristics and intraoperative choices that predicted higher and lower SF-36 Physical Component scores after ACL reconstruction.
  • JOSPT co-author Dustin Grooms, PhD, will share recently published results of a study that employed functional MRI to investigate brain-activation differences between patients who did and did not undergo ACL reconstruction.

Moderated by Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT, a leading authority on rehabilitation of sports injuries, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators Eric McCarty, MD, and Karin Silbernagel, PT, PhD. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Seats are limited, so Register Now.

* This webinar is complimentary for those who attend the event live.

Coming in 2017: JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+

JBJS, Inc., is pleased to announce the development of JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+.

Using research-proven, state-of-the-art adaptive learning technology developed by Area9 and employed by NEJM Knowledge+, JBJS Clinical Classroom will provide orthopaedic surgeons with a personalized learning experience at any stage in their career.

Users will learn by answering case-based, short-form, and fill-in-the-blank questions based on JBJS gold-standard content, enhanced  by technology that continuously adapts to learners’ goals, pace, and knowledge gaps.

JBJS Clinical Classroom on NEJM Knowledge+ will be available before the end of 2017.

Guest Post: From Mentees to Mentors—Paying It Forward

Rich Yoon Headshot.jpgOrthoBuzz occasionally receives posts from guest bloggers. This guest post comes from Richard Yoon, MD.

With 6 months left in my trauma fellowship, the excitement, anticipation, and sometimes terror around finally beginning my young career continues to build. However, on a flight back from the recent AOTrauma Fellows Course, I also became equally excited (but not so terrified) about the opportunity to start paying it forward.

Being surrounded by some of the best minds in orthopaedic trauma, both young and seasoned, was not only a boost for our clinical acumen, but more importantly was also inspirational. I experienced first-hand the faculty’s dedication to teaching the next generation. Taking time away from their families, their patients, and their institutions, the AOTrauma faculty truly exemplified the role of “educators.” By discussing their experiences—with us and with one another—I saw yet again that life-long learning is very real, and it’s how you continue to get better everyday.

I am not writing about this recent experience to promote a specific organization, but rather to remind my generation of young surgeons that soon it will be our turn to pay it forward by filling the big shoes of mentorship, education, and leadership.

No matter what your specialty is, if you have not done so already, I urge you to join your respective organizations and get involved in some capacity. To echo the words of my own mentor, Frank Liporace, MD, “No one is asking you to run the entire thing, but trust me, in whatever capacity you participate, you will definitely learn something to get you better, and in the end, you will find a network of friends who become family.”

In 2017, the “family” of orthopaedic professionals is growing larger, more specialized, and more interconnected and accessible than ever. Our orthopaedic family continues to push the field forward, finding new ways to educate, research, and improve patient care.

So I urge my classmates of talented individuals: please honor those teachers and mentors who have enriched our lives. Let’s pay it forward, continue to work hard, and try to stay involved, because one day, we will need another generation to do the same for us.

Richard Yoon, MD is a fellow in orthopaedic traumatology and complex adult reconstruction at Orlando Regional Medical Center.

New JBJS Virtual Recertification Course Now Available

11-2016_VCR_II_Template-Final.jpgThe Second Edition of the JBJS Virtual Recertification Course, in association with the Miller Review Course, is now available.  Featuring 15 updated modules, the course now includes the option to purchase bundles of 3 modules to address your specific educational needs.  Presented by top lecturers, the course is approved for 22.5 AMA PRA Category I credits™ and ABOS-approved for 10 self-assessment examination (SAE) credits.

Each module includes pre- and post-test assessments, hour-long video-learning components, and citations to relevant literature.

Click here to purchase the full 15-module course or five different 3-module bundles.

Topics/faculty presenters include:

  • Adult Hip Reconstruction by Dr. James Browne
  • Adult Knee Reconstruction by Dr. Edward McPherson
  • Basic Science by Dr. Winston Gwathmey
  • Foot and Ankle by Dr. Steven Haddad
  • Hand and Wrist by Dr. Sanjeev Kakar
  • MRI by Dr. Timothy Sanders
  • Pediatric Orthopaedics by Dr. Jeremy Rush
  • Orthopaedic Oncology by Dr. Ginger Holt
  • Rehabilitation by Dr. MaCalus Hogan
  • Spine by Dr. Francis Shen
  • Sports: Upper Extremity by Dr. Kevin Plancher
  • Sports: Lower Extremity by Dr. Mark Miller
  • Test Prep/Statistics by Dr. Stephen Thompson
  • Trauma: Pelvic and Upper Extremity by Dr. Thomas Schaller
  • Trauma: Lower Extremity by Dr. Michael LeCroy

JBJS Elite Reviewers: Updated

The JBJS Elite Reviewers Program publicly recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. Reviewers who review 4 or more manuscripts per year, rarely decline an invitation to review a manuscript (responding within 48 hours), and complete highly graded reviews within 1 week are eligible for the program. Elite Reviewers receive the following benefits in recognition of their exemplary performance:

  • No submission fees for papers of which the reviewer is the first author (for 12 months)
  • Free CME credits for all reviews
  • Free online access to all JBJS publications
  • A letter to the reviewer’s department head from JBJS Editor-in-Chief, Marc Swiontkowski, MD, recognizing and commending his/her good work
  • Name recognition on the JBJS Elite Reviewers Program Web page and on the masthead of The Journal

For JBJS Consultant Reviewer Guidelines, visit http://bit.ly/2cWvYvc.

To learn how you can be a better reviewer visit http://bit.ly/2cRt1hY.

Here is an updated list of JBJS Elite Reviewers:

 
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JBJS Elite Reviewers

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JBJS Reviewers are key to The Journal’s ability to publish the highest quality of evidence-based information, to advance research, and to enhance the quality of care for orthopaedic patients. The JBJS Elite Reviewers Program publicly recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. We hope that the Program and its reviewer benefits will encourage all reviewers to aspire to meet the program requirements.

Reviewers who review 4 or more manuscripts per year, rarely decline an invitation to review a manuscript (responding within 48 hours), and complete highly graded reviews within 1 week are eligible for the program. Elite Reviewers receive the following benefits in recognition of their exemplary performance:

  • No submission fees for papers of which the reviewer is the first author (for 12 months)
  • Free CME credits for all reviews
  • Free online access to all JBJS publications
  • A letter to the reviewer’s department head from JBJS Editor-in-Chief, Marc Swiontkowski, MD, recognizing and commending his/her good work
  • Name recognition on the JBJS Elite Reviewers Program Web page and on the masthead of The Journal

For JBJS Consultant Reviewer Guidelines, visit http://bit.ly/2cWvYvc.

To learn how you can be a better reviewer visit http://bit.ly/2cRt1hY.

Here is the current list of JBJS Elite Reviewers:

Steven P. Arnoczky
George Babis
Ryan Calfee
Antonia F. Chen
Charles Cornell
Charles  Cox
John M. Cuckler
Thomas A. DeCoster
Lawrence Dorr
Freddie H. Fu
H. Kerr  Graham
Greg Guyton
Edward Joseph Harvey
James A. Keeney
Mark C. Lee
Stephen Li
Leisel D. Masson
Michael D. McKee
Omer Mei-Dan
Robert  Pilliar
Matt Provencher
Dino  Samartzis
Andrew Jason Schoenfeld
Edward M. Schwarz
Howard Joel Seeherman
George H. Thompson
Andre  van Wijnen
J. Michael Wiater
David Wong
Adolph J. Yates

 

Peer Review Week: Day 4

JBJS is helping celebrate Peer Review Week 2016 by formally recognizing some of its top reviewers for their contributions. Each day during Peer Review Week 2016, JBJS will profile three different top reviewers on OrthoBuzz. The week will culminate with a listing of our current Elite Reviewers.

Today, let’s meet Harry McKellop, Gordon Groh, and Philipp Moroder:

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Harry McKellop, PhD
UCLA

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
It helps to keep me informed of the latest accomplishments in research; I usually
am able to suggest ways for the authors to improve their manuscripts; in the end,
it is a benefit to the orthopaedic community and the patients.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I am a “retired” emeritus professor; but I always considered reviewing
for JBJS as an enjoyable way for giving  back to the profession.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
The research and clinical papers provide valuable information and guidelines
for improving the quality of care to the patients.

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Gordon Groh, MD
Mission Health

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Reviewing offers me the opportunity to “make a bigger impact.” Changing the paradigms for patient care affects entire populations of individuals and improves outcomes for everyone.  JBJS leads the effort to study, report, understand and improve musculoskeletal disease processes, and I am delighted to play a role.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Giving back is an inherent part of the contract which each of us is bound to as part of our training process.  Doing the right thing is never easy or convenient, but the rewards always outweigh the inconvenience.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS creates a landscape which is both permanent and evolving.  The Journal creates a permanent electronic record of our current thoughts regarding musculoskeletal disease and produces a template for understanding that which is ever-changing.

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Philipp Moroder, MD
Charitè Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The JBJS is a top-notch Journal which features high-quality manuscripts. Additionally, the editorial staff is great and puts
a lot of effort into even further improving the content quality.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Even though my schedule is pretty busy, I try my best to “fit-in” the JBJS reviews since to me it is a great honour to serve as a reviewer for
the JBJS.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS is probably one of the orthopaedic journals with  the most “clinical
impact.”Due to its high publication standards and excellent content,
it is a great source for information on what is new in the field of orthopedics
and offers ideas and solutions for the improvement of our daily patient care.

Peer Review Week: Day 3

JBJS is helping celebrate Peer Review Week 2016 by formally recognizing some of its top reviewers for their contributions. Each day during Peer Review Week 2016, JBJS will profile three different top reviewers on OrthoBuzz. The week will culminate with a listing of our Elite Reviewers for the first half of 2016.

Today, let’s meet Chad Mather, Carola van Eck, and David Kovacevic:

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Chad Mather, MD
Duke Health

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
I always look forward to reviewing articles for JBJS as they are always interesting
and related to my area of expertise.The articles are typically well written so I
am able to focus on the quality of the methods and direction of the discussion.
This makes it an enjoyable and stimulating experience.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
It is a challenge but I usually read them while riding my indoor cycle.
The two work together to keep me fit and not too far behind in my reviews!
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
Impact factor aside, JBJS is the most credible and prestigious orthopaedic
journal.  Articles published in JBJS will always be highly read, cited and respected.
JBJS has a role in not only ensuring the scientific methods are correct
but also to choose articles that lead our field into the future.

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Carola van Eck, MD
Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
I love that I could be the first person reading about the latest and greatest
breakthroughs in orthopaedic surgery.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Peer reviewing is fun, but can take a substantial amount of time. Luckily,
you get faster at it as you gain more experience. Usually I find time
between my cases to work on peer reviews.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
I believe JBJS continues to be a top journal in the field of orthopaedics. Its
Impact Factor has consistently been amongst the highest in the field,
proving the journal will have a huge role in shaping the future or orthopaedics.

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David Kovacevic, MD
Yale University

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Opportunity to review manuscripts that have the potential to change the way we practice orthopaedics.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
It is a privilege to be a reviewer for the leading orthopaedic journal in the world so finding time to help the section editors is a top priority.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
Providing orthopaedic surgeons and musculoskeletal providers with the best evidence-based medicine by integrating basic science research with clinical expertise to enhance patient outcomes.