Modern Irrigation/Debridement Yields Good Results for Early Post-THA Infection

Hip Debridement for OBuzzNowadays, chronic deep periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are typically treated with 2-stage exchange arthroplasty, but what about acute PJIs? In the December 6, 2017 edition of JBJS, Bryan et al. report on a retrospective cohort study of acute infections after hip arthroplasty. The results suggest we’ve come a long way in identifying patients with early infections and that contemporary irrigation-and-debridement protocols are more successful than older methods.

The researchers studied 6-year outcomes in 90 hips that had undergone either total or hemiarthroplasty and that were determined to have either acute early postoperative infections (n=66) or acute hematogenous infections (n=24). All the infected hips were managed with either irrigation, debridement, and modular head and liner exchange (70%) or with irrigation and debridement alone (30%). The authors stratified the patients into those without comorbidities (A), those with 1 or 2 comorbidities (B), and those with >2 comorbidities (C). Postoperatively, patients were treated with broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, followed by targeted therapy administered by infectious disease specialists.

Of the 90 acute infections, failure—defined as uneradicated infection, subsequent removal of any component for infection, unplanned second wound debridement for ongoing infection, or infection-related mortality—occurred in 15 hips (17%). Of those 15, 9 required component removal. The chances of treatment failure were slightly higher in cases of hematogenous infection (21%), compared with acute early postoperative infection (15%), but that difference was not statistically significant. Significant comorbidity-related failure-rate differences were found: failure occurred in 8% of the grade-A patients, 16% of grade-B patients, and 44% of grade-C patients. The most common infecting organism was methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA).

From this overall 6-year success rate of 83%, the authors conclude that “with modern inclusion criteria for acute infection, modern surgical techniques, and modern antibiotic therapy…the rate of success was higher than in most historic reports.”

What’s New in Orthopaedic Rehabilitation 2017

Specialty Update Image for OBuzzEvery month, JBJS publishes a Specialty Update—a review of the most pertinent and impactful studies published in the orthopaedic literature during the previous year in 13 subspecialties. Click here for a collection of all OrthoBuzz Specialty Update summaries.

This month, Nitin Jain, MD, MSPH, a co-author of the November 15, 2017 Specialty Update on Orthopaedic Rehabilitation, summarized the most clinically compelling findings from among the nearly 50 noteworthy studies summarized in the article.

Pain Management
–Results from a retrospective review1 of patients with noncancer pain highlighted that the risks of long-acting opioids extend beyond overdose, and include increased risks of cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality.

–A randomized prospective trial2 comparing celecoxib, ibuprofen, and naproxen for treating arthritis pain found no significant difference in the hazard ratios for those medications as related to risk of cardiovascular events.

Cost & Quality
–An assessment of a value-improvement initiative3 that examined hip and knee arthroplasty and hip fracture outcomes in a large regional health-care system found reduced costs and improvements in quality of care from 2012 to 2016.

Concussion
–A literature review4 of 7 studies determined that the long-term cognitive and neurogenerative effects of multiple concussions in patients ≤17 years of age remain inconclusive.

Spine
–A randomized trial5 found no difference between anesthetic-only and anesthetic-plus-steroid epidural injections in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.

Shoulder
–A prospective cohort study6 by the MOON Shoulder Group found that the strongest predictor of failure of nonoperative treatment for symptomatic atraumatic rotator cuff tears was lower patient expectations that such treatment would be successful. Pain level, duration of symptoms, and tear anatomy did not predict treatment failure.

References

  1. Ray WA, Chung CP, Murray KT, Hall K, Stein CM. Prescription of long-acting opioids and mortality in patients with chronic noncancer pain. JAMA. 2016 Jun 14;315(22):2415-23.
  2. Nissen SE, Yeomans ND, Solomon DH, Lüscher TF, Libby P, Husni ME,Graham DY, Borer JS, Wisniewski LM, Wolski KE, Wang Q, Menon V,Ruschitzka F, Gaffney M, Beckerman B, Berger MF, Bao W, Lincoff AM; PRECISION Trial Investigators. Cardiovascular safety of celecoxib, naproxen, or ibuprofen for arthritis. N Engl J Med. 2016 Dec 29;375(26):2519-29. Epub 2016 Nov 13.
  3. Lee VS, Kawamoto K, Hess R, Park C, Young J, Hunter C, Johnson S,Gulbransen S, Pelt CE, Horton DJ, Graves KK, Greene TH, Anzai Y, Pendleton RC. Implementation of a value-driven outcomes program to identify high variability in clinical costs and outcomes and association with reduced cost and improved quality. JAMA. 2016 Sep 13;316(10):1061-72.
  4. Yumul JN, McKinlay A. Do multiple concussions lead to cumulative cognitive deficits? A literature review. PM&R. 2016 Nov;8(11):1097-103. Epub 2016 May 18.
  5. Friedly JL, Comstock BA, Turner JA, Heagerty PJ, Deyo RA, Sullivan SD,Bauer Z, Bresnahan BW, Avins AL, Nedeljkovic SS, Nerenz DR, Standaert C,Kessler L, Akuthota V, Annaswamy T, Chen A, Diehn F, Firtch W, Gerges FJ,Gilligan C, Goldberg H, Kennedy DJ, Mandel S, Tyburski M, Sanders W, Sibell D, Smuck M, Wasan A, Won L, Jarvik JG. A randomized trial of epidural glucocorticoid injections for spinal stenosis. N Engl J Med. 2014 Jul 03;371(1):11-21.
  6. Dunn WR, Kuhn JE, Sanders R, An Q, Baumgarten KM, Bishop JY, Brophy RH,Carey JL, Harrell F, Holloway BG, Jones GL, Ma CB, Marx RG, McCarty EC,Poddar SK, Smith MV, Spencer EE, Vidal AF, Wolf BR, Wright RW; MOON Shoulder Group. 2013 Neer Award: predictors of failure of nonoperative treatment of chronic, symptomatic, full-thickness rotator cuff tears. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2016 Aug;25(8):1303-11.

Outpatient Knee Replacement Complications: How Important Are They?

Outpatient TKA for OBuzzIn the December 6, 2017 issue of The Journal, Arshi et al. report on a detailed analysis of a large administrative database, looking specifically at one-year complications associated with outpatient versus standard inpatient knee replacement. This type of analysis is crucial because of the rapidly growing interest in outpatient joint replacement among patients, payers, and the orthopaedic community.

The data convince me that these outpatient procedures should proceed, but with a little more caution. Although the absolute complication rates in both surgical settings were very low, after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, the authors found a higher relative risk of several surgical and medical complications among outpatients—including component failure, infection, knee stiffness requiring manipulation under anesthesia, and deep vein thrombosis.

One important element that is lacking in this analysis is adjustment for surgeon/hospital volume. We know from important work by Katz and others that patients managed at centers and by surgeons with greater volumes of total knee replacement have lower risks of perioperative adverse events.

These results from Arshi et al. are definitely not a call to stop the expansion of outpatient joint replacement protocols. Instead, I think this study should prompt every joint-replacement center to analyze its risk-adjusted inpatient and outpatient outcomes—and to ensure, as these authors emphasize, that outpatients receive the same level of attention to rehabilitation, antibiotic administration, and thromboprophylaxis as inpatients.

Enhancing outpatient knee-replacement protocols will serve local communities well, and the nationwide orthopaedic community will receive further confirmation that outpatient joint replacement is a move in the right direction.

Marc Swiontkowski, MD
JBJS Editor-in-Chief

December 2017 Article Exchange with JOSPT

JOSPT_Article_Exchange_LogoIn 2015, JBJS launched an “article exchange” collaboration with the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) to support multidisciplinary integration, continuity of care, and excellent patient outcomes in orthopaedics and sports medicine.

During the month of December 2017, JBJS and OrthoBuzz readers will have open access to the JOSPT article titled “Hip Abductor Muscle Volume and Strength Differences Between Women With Chronic Hip Joint Pain and Asymptomatic Controls.

This cross-sectional study demonstrated that women with chronic hip joint pain had larger gluteal muscle volume but decreased hip abductor strength, compared to asymptomatic controls.

Webinar on Dec. 13—Patient Satisfaction After ACL Surgery

webinar speakersAn estimated 300,000 ACL surgeries are performed in the US annually, at an estimated cost of up to $1 billion, but we still have many unanswered questions about patient satisfaction after these procedures. Among them:

  • Does the cost of postoperative physical therapy affect patient satisfaction?
  • What are the rates and predictors of return to play after ACL reconstruction? Does graft choice play a role?
  • What is the relationship between return to play and patient satisfaction?

On Wednesday, December 13, 2017 at 8:00 PM EST, the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) will host a complimentary* LIVE webinar that addresses these and other important questions.

JOSPT co-author Caitlin J. Miller, PT, DPT and JBJS co-author Benedict U. Nwachukwu, MDMBA, will discuss findings from their respective studies, and the webinar will include additional insights from Mark V. Paterno, PT, PhD, MBA, SCS, ATC, and Elizabeth Matzkin, MD. Moderated by Tara Jo ManalPT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAPTA, the webinar will conclude with a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Seats are limited so REGISTER NOW.

*All registrants will have free access to the webinar for 24 hours following the live broadcast.

The Rapid Growth of Orthopaedics in China

WI Banner for OBuzz

The November 1, 2017 issue of JBJS contains another in a series of “What’s Important” personal essays from orthopaedic clinicians. This “What’s Important” article comes from Dr. Cyril Mauffrey.

Having grown up in Hong Kong and Singapore, Dr. Mauffrey juxtaposes the economic growth in China over 35 years with the transformation during the last decade in the practice of orthoapedics in this land of 1.4 billion people. With both a personal and professional perspective, he explains how China has adapted orthopaedically—with the help of the Chinese Orthopaedic Association, AO Asia Pacific, and several pioneering individuals—to “standardize care and promote clinical excellence and innovation across the nation.”

If you would like JBJS to consider your “What’s Important” story for publication, please submit a manuscript via Editorial Manager. When asked to select an article type, please choose Orthopaedic Forum and include “What’s Important:” at the beginning of the title.

Because they are personal in nature, “What’s Important” submissions will not be subject to the usual stringent JBJS peer-review process. Instead, they will be reviewed by the Editor-in-Chief, who will correspond with the author if revisions are necessary and make the final decision regarding acceptance.

FTC Gets Injunction Against Predatory Publisher

FTC LogoAccording to a recent report on Retraction Watch, one day after OrthoBuzz posted an article about predatory publishers, a federal court ordered Srinubabu Gedela, CEO of OMICS Group and two sister companies, to stop what the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) said in an August 2016 lawsuit were deceptive business practices related to journal publishing. On its website, OMICS claims to publish “700+ open access journals.”

In issuing the preliminary injunction, US District Court Judge Gloria Navarro found evidence supporting the FTC’s claims that OMICS misled readers about whether articles had been peer-reviewed, hid publishing fees until after papers had been accepted, and presented misleading impact-factor data.

Under the preliminary injunction, OMICS will still be able to publish journals; the injunction relates only to specific “misrepresentations.” Gregory Ashe, a senior attorney at the FTC, told Retraction Watch that “nothing in this order goes to what [OMICS] can or can’t publish in terms of content. This is about how they are soliciting would-be academics to publish in their journals.”

If the FTC learns from academic consumers that OMICS is violating this injunction, the commission would then have to file a contempt-of-court motion. If you feel you have been victimized by unfair or deceptive business practices in academic publishing, you can contact the FTC’s Consumer Response Center at 1-877-382-4357.

Jason Miller, JBJS Executive Publisher
Lloyd Resnick, JBJS Developmental Editor

Patient Satisfaction After ACL Reconstruction—Dec. 13 Webinar

webinar speakersWe still have many unanswered questions about patient satisfaction after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction.

  • Do specific patient populations benefit from more or fewer physical therapy (PT) visits?
  • Does the cost of PT affect patient satisfaction?
  • Should patients be classified by factors beyond their medical diagnoses to achieve the best outcomes while minimizing costs?
  • What are the rates and predictors of return to play after ACL reconstruction? Does graft choice play a role?
  • What is the relationship between return to play and patient satisfaction?

On Wednesday, December 13, 2017 at 8:00 PM EST, the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) will host a complimentary* LIVE webinar that addresses these important and clinically applicable questions.

JOSPT co-author Caitlin J. Miller, PT, DPT, will share the results of a retrospective cohort study examining the relationship between patient demographics, number of physical therapy visits, and the cost of postoperative interventions with revision rates and patient-reported outcomes following primary ACL reconstruction.

JBJS co-author Benedict U. Nawachukwu, MD, MBA, will discuss findings from a study  of return to play and patient satisfaction among athletes following ACL reconstruction. This study also explores the efficacy of patellar tendon autografts and the preinjury impact of certain sports.

Moderated by Tara Jo Manal, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, FAPTA, a leading authority on the spine and the knee, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators Mark V. Paterno, PT, PhD, MBA, SCS, ATC, and Elizabeth Matzkin, MD. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Seats are limited so REGISTER NOW.

*All registrants will have free access to the webinar for 24 hours following the live broadcast.

Fructosamine Bests HbA1c for Preop Glycemic Screening

Fructosamine for OBuzzPatients with diabetes have an increased risk of postoperative complications following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Additionally, perioperative hyperglycemia has been identified as a common and independent risk factor for periprosthetic joint infection, even among patients without diabetes. Therefore, knowing a patient’s glycemic status prior to surgery is very helpful.

In the November 15, 2017 edition of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, Shohat et al. demonstrate that serum fructosamine, a measure of glycemic control obtainable via a simple and inexpensive blood test, is a good predictor of adverse outcomes among TJA patients—whether or not they have diabetes.

Researchers screened 829 patients undergoing TJA for serum fructosamine and HbA1c—a common measure, levels of which <7% are typically considered good glycemic control. Patients with fructosamine levels ≥292 µmol/L had a significantly higher risk of postoperative deep infection, readmission, and reoperation, while HbA1c levels ≥7% showed no significant correlations with any of those three adverse outcomes. Among the 51 patients who had fructosamine levels ≥292 µmol/L, 39% did not have HbA1c levels ≥7%, and 35% did not have diabetes.

In addition to being more predictive of postsurgical complications than HbA1c, fructosamine is also a more practical measurement. A high HbA1c level during preop screening could mean postponing surgery for 2 to 3 months, while the patient waits to see whether HbA1c levels come down. Fructosamine levels, on the other hand, change within 14 to 21 days, so patients could be reassessed for glycemic control after only 2 or 3 weeks.

While conceding that the ≥292 µmol/L threshold for fructosamine suggested in this study should not be etched in stone, the authors conclude that “fructosamine could serve as the screening marker of choice” for presurgical glycemic assessment. However, because the study did not examine whether correcting fructosamine levels leads to reduced postoperative complications, a prospective clinical trial to answer that question is needed.