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Journal Club Resident Spotlight: Brian Goh

JBJS is pleased to highlight the orthopaedic residents who help implement the Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grants at their institutions. The purpose of this program is to promote career-long skills in evaluating the orthopaedic literature as it relates to practice decision making among orthopaedic residents. Click here for more information about the grant program.

Name: Brian Goh, MD

Affiliation: Harvard Combined Orthopaedic Residency Program, Boston, MA

What was the topic of the most “dynamic” journal club meeting you have had so far this year?

One of the most dynamic and engaging journal clubs we have had centered around both residency [1] and fellowship [2] selection – a topic of universal interest for both residents and faculty. This journal club was particularly interesting in the setting of the recent changes to the USMLE Step 1 and how the assessment of medical students will change in the future. We analyzed the merits of these manuscripts, and our discussion led to commentary on the current state of the residency and fellowship selection process.

[1] Trikha R, Keswani A, Ishmael CR, Greig D, Kelley BV, Bernthal NM. Current Trends in Orthopaedic Surgery Residency Applications and Match Rates. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2020 Jan 6:10.2106/JBJS.19.00930. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00930. PMID: 31904608.

[2] Krueger CA, Helms JR, Bell AJ, Israel H, Cannada LK. How the Reputation of Orthopaedic Residency Programs Is Associated with Orthopaedic Fellowship Match Results. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2020 Jan 8:10.2106/JBJS.19.00750. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00750. PMID: 31913867.

Based on your journal club experiences, what are the top 3 characteristics of an engaging, enlightening journal club presentation?

Our journal clubs usually consist of manuscript topics that directly impact clinical practice and demonstrate clear, foreseeable patient application. Another characteristic is inviting faculty who are engaged in similar areas of research and can comment on the merits of the manuscripts discussed. Lastly, our journal clubs have been fortunate to receive visits from JBJS Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Marc Swiontkowski. He provides unique insight into the review process of manuscripts and how these articles have contributed to the broader musculoskeletal literature.

What advice about running a top-notch journal club program do you have for residents who will manage a Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grant next year?

Our journal clubs are structured so that each article is jointly presented by a junior and senior resident. The junior resident presents the article and study design, while the senior resident provides context of the research and the strengths and weaknesses of the manuscript. Our discussions typically follow Dr. Seth Leopold’s framework [1] on thoughtful analysis of orthopaedic literature. To allow more residents to participate, we also have our journal clubs streamed to our off-site residents. As residency training evolves to include more off-site rotations, finding a mutual time and place is increasingly difficult. We have found videoconferencing to be immensely beneficial to include all of our residents, near and far. Good food and beverage also help maximize attendance!

[1] Leopold SS. Editorial: Getting the Most from What You Read in Orthopaedic Journals. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2017;475(7):1757–1761. doi:10.1007/s11999-017-5371-0

Aside from orthopaedic content (journals and otherwise), what have you been reading lately?

I recently took a course in Value-Based Health Care Delivery at Harvard Business School that is based on the research of Dr. Michael Porter. I am now reading Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results by Drs. Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg to better understand how health care delivery is changing and how we can maximize value in patient care.

Journal Club Resident Spotlight: Elizabeth Scott

JBJS is pleased to highlight the orthopaedic residents who help implement the Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grants at their institutions. The purpose of this program is to promote career-long skills in evaluating the orthopaedic literature as it relates to practice decision making among orthopaedic residents. Click here for more information about the grant program.

 

Name: Elizabeth Scott, MD

Affiliation: University of Iowa

What was the topic of the most “dynamic” journal club meeting you have had so far this year?

We were fortunate to host this year’s Arthur Steindler Award recipient, Dr. Margaret McQueen at our journal club when she visited our department earlier this year. We had a lively discussion regarding the diagnosis of compartment syndrome, and the use of continuous compartment pressure monitoring. We discussed the pros and cons of our current practices and how they could be improved. Having the original author present was extraordinarily valuable!

McQueen MM, Duckworth AD, Aitken SA, Court-Brown CM. The estimated sensitivity and specificity of compartment pressure monitoring for acute compartment syndrome. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2013;95(8):673–677. doi:10.2106/JBJS.K.01731

Based on your journal club experiences, what are the top 3 characteristics of an engaging, enlightening journal club presentation?

There are a few characteristics of a good journal club. The first is the most obvious – attendees actually have to read the articles in advance. Limit the number of articles you choose, and send them out well in advance so everyone has time to prepare. The second is a clear structure – we allot a certain amount of time to each article and guide junior residents on how to present an article succinctly. Lastly, you must have faculty commitment. Letting faculty approve or suggest articles, as well as the meeting venue, can help.

What advice about running a top-notch journal club program do you have for residents who will manage a Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grant next year?

Come up with a system for how things are done, and stick to it! Everyone (staff, residents, students) should know exactly what to expect and feel prepared. Avoid pressured “pimp sessions” and focus on group learning and discussion. Journal club should be something residents and staff look forward to.

Aside from orthopaedic content (journals and otherwise), what have you been reading lately?

I’m a fan of audiobooks – easy to listen to in the car or walking home – and particularly nonfiction. If you’re looking for some motivation, check out “Can’t Hurt Me” by David Goggins, a Navy Seal and elite ultramarathoner. I’m currently listening to Greg McKeown’s “The Disciplined Pursuit of Less,” which tackles the idea of essentialism.

Journal Club Resident Spotlight: Carl Herndon

JBJS is pleased to highlight the orthopaedic residents who help implement the Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grants at their institutions. The purpose of this program is to promote career-long skills in evaluating the orthopaedic literature as it relates to practice decision making among orthopaedic residents. Click here for more information about the grant program.

Name: Carl Herndon, MD

Affiliation: Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY

What was the topic of the most “dynamic” journal club meeting you have had so far this year?

We recently had a journal club focusing on adult joint reconstruction, and discussed different fixation strategies of implants (broadly cement vs cementless fixation). We evaluated the following 3 studies:

Stea S, Comfort T, Sedrakyan A, Havelin L, Marinelli M, Barber T, Paxton E, Banerjee S, Isaacs AJ, Graves S. Multinational comprehensive evaluation of the fixation method used in hip replacement: interaction with age in context. The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume. 2014 Dec;96(Suppl 1):42-51.

Khanuja HS, Vakil JJ, Goddard MS, Mont MA. Cementless femoral fixation in total hip arthroplasty. JBJS. 2011 Mar 2;93(5):500-9.

Nam D, Lawrie CM, Salih R, Nahhas CR, Barrack RL, Nunley RM. Cemented versus cementless total knee arthroplasty of the same modern design: a prospective, randomized trial. The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume. 2019 Jul 3;101(13):1185.

Based on your journal club experiences, what are the top 3 characteristics of an engaging, enlightening journal club presentation?

1. Hand-on activities: We always lead off our journal club with a sawbones exercise where senior residents, fellows, and attendings lead junior residents through a topical saw bones. Great to get everyone thinking and a chance for everyone to learn.

2. Multilevel involvement: Having everyone there from interns all the way to senior attendings is critical as we evaluate the literature with different biases and can all learn together.

3. Atmosphere: Reading these articles and discussing them doesn’t have to be boring! Having food or snacks and scheduling it at the end of the day allows for a more laid-back vibe to learning that is conducive to discussion.

What advice about running a top-notch journal club program do you have for residents who will manage a Robert Bucholz Resident Journal Club Grant next year?

Plan it out in advance, and put dates on the calendar for everyone to know when it’s happening. Nothing worse than trying to do all this work and having no one show up!

Aside from orthopaedic content (journals and otherwise), what have you been reading lately?

Once a Runner by John L. Parker Jr. One of my favorite books.