JBJS 100: Controlling Bone Growth and Revision THA Stats

JBJS 100Under one name or another, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery has published quality orthopaedic content spanning three centuries. In 1919, our publication was called the Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery, and the first volume of that journal was Volume 1 of what we know today as JBJS.

Thus, the 24 issues we turn out in 2018 will constitute our 100th volume. To help celebrate this milestone, throughout the year we will be spotlighting 100 of the most influential JBJS articles on OrthoBuzz, making the original content openly accessible for a limited time.

Unlike the scientific rigor of Journal content, the selection of this list was not entirely scientific. About half we picked from “JBJS Classics,” which were chosen previously by current and past JBJS Editors-in-Chief and Deputy Editors. We also selected JBJS articles that have been cited more than 1,000 times in other publications, according to Google Scholar search results. Finally, we considered “activity” on the Web of Science and The Journal’s websites.

We hope you enjoy and benefit from reading these groundbreaking articles from JBJS, as we mark our 100th volume. Here are two more:

Control of Bone Growth by Epiphyseal Stapling: A Preliminary Report
W P Blount and G R Clarke: JBJS, 1949 July; 31 (3): 464
This 14-page, amply illustrated article was the oldest paper selected by Kavanagh et al. in their 2013 JBJS bibliometric analysis of the 100 classic papers of pediatric orthopaedics. Blount and Clarke proved definitively that long-bone growth could be arrested by appropriately timed epiphyseal stapling and that growth would resume after staple removal. Their work spared many children with linear or angular leg deformities—often a result of polio—from the risk of more invasive operative methods.

Epidemiology of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty in the US
K J Bozic, S M Kurtz, E Lau, K Ong, T P Vail, D J Berry: JBJS, 2009 January; 91 (1): 128
Fast forwarding 60 years from the Blount and Clarke study, we arrive at this epidemiological analysis of >51,000 revision hip replacements. The findings from this 2009 Level II prognostic study provided information that has guided THA research, implant design, and clinical decision-making throughout the past decade.

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