Webinar on March 29 – Spondylolysis in Adolescents: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes

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Low back pain is not typically thought to be a pediatric issue; however, this condition occurs in 33% of adolescents each year—a rate similar to that seen in adults. The most common identifiable cause of low back pain in the adolescent is spondylolysis, a defect in the pars interarticularis. How is this condition best diagnosed and treated? Do oblique radiographs help diagnose spondylolysis in adolescents? What kind of short- and long-term clinical outcomes can adolescents—and especially adolescent athletes—diagnosed with acute spondylolysis expect to have? What factors might predict long-term outcomes?

These important and clinically applicable questions will be addressed during a complimentary LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS).

JBJS presenter, Peter Passias, MD, will discuss findings from a retrospective study of adolescents with and without L5 spondylolysis to address whether oblique radiographic views add value in the diagnosis of this cause of low back pain. This paper specifically addresses whether the diagnostic benefit of four-view studies outweighs the additional cost and radiation exposure, especially for young people.

JOSPT co-author Mitchell Selhorst, DPT, OCS, will share the results of a retrospective review of acute spondylolytic injuries in young athletes. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes for these patients and identifies significant predictors of these outcomes.

Moderated by JBJS Deputy Editor Andrew J. Schoenfeld, MD, who specializes in spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and spinal surgery, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators, Chris Bono, MD,from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Michael Allen, PT, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Space is limited, so Register Now.

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