Pre-Visit Pain and Anxiety Influence Patient Satisfaction

Biopsychosocial for O'BuzzExperienced orthopaedic clinicians understand that anxious patients with high levels of pain are  some of the most challenging to evaluate and treat. Both anxiety and pain siphon away the patient’s focus and concentration, complicating the surgeon’s job of relaying key diagnostic and treatment information—often leaving patients confused and dissatisfied. Moreover, such patients usually want a quick solution to their physical pain and mental angst, whether that be a prescription for medication or surgery.  At the same time, despite controversy, variously defined levels of “patient satisfaction” are being used as a metric to evaluate quality and value throughout the US health-care system. This reinforces the need for orthopaedists to understand the complex interplay between biological and psychological elements of patient encounters.

In the November 7, 2018 issue of The Journal, Tyser et al. use validated instruments to clarify the relationship between a patient’s pre-existing function, pain, and anxiety and the satisfaction the patient received from a new or returning outpatient visit to a hand/upper extremity clinic. Not surprisingly, the authors found that higher levels of physical function prior to the clinic visit correlated with increased satisfaction after the visit, as measured by the widely used Press Ganey online satisfaction survey.  They also noted that higher antecedent levels of anxiety and pain, as determined by two PROMIS instruments, correlated with decreased levels of patient satisfaction with the visit. The authors assessed patient satisfaction only with the clinic visit and the care provider, not with any subsequent treatment.

Most patients are likely to experience some level of pain or anxiety when they meet with an orthopaedic surgeon. To leave patients more content with these visits, we need to set appropriate expectations for the visit in advance of the interaction and develop real-time, in-clinic strategies that help patients cope with anxiety. Such “biopsychosocial” strategies may not by themselves dictate the ultimate treatment, but they may go a long way toward helping patients understand their options and feel satisfied with the care provided. Secondarily, such strategies may help improve the satisfaction scores that administrators, rightly or wrongly, are increasingly using to evaluate musculoskeletal practitioners.

Marc Swiontkowski, MD
JBJS Editor-in-Chief

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One response to “Pre-Visit Pain and Anxiety Influence Patient Satisfaction”

  1. Lois Corrigan says :

    Your analysis is shallow. Being an adult with a rare musculoskeletal birth defect I’ve been in a number of ortho offices. As a patient I’m stressed with: short appointment— so short if I don’t talk fast like a lunatic the doctor is jetting out to the next patient in 10 minutes.
    Second, many ortho surgeons don’t make sure their phones are covered. How can my OS know PO I’m in pain?

    Like

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