Don’t Overlook Possible Osteoid Osteoma in Kids with Hip Pain

Orthopaedists are seeing an increasing number of active, young patients with hip pain. A study by May et al. in the March 20, 2019 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery strongly suggests that osteoid osteoma (OO)—a small, benign tumor characterized by dense sclerotic bone tissue—should not be overlooked in the differential diagnosis when working up these patients.

The authors identified and reviewed the records of 50 children and adolescents (mean age of 12.4 years) at their tertiary-care pediatric center who had received a diagnosis of OO within or around the hip between 2003 and 2015. Nighttime hip and/or thigh pain (90%) and symptom relief with NSAIDs (88%) were common clinical findings.

Sclerosis/cortical thickening was visible in 58% of the radiographs. Perilesional edema and a radiolucent nidus was found on all 43 of the available CT scans, leading the authors to conclude that “CT scans provide definitive diagnosis” of OO.

Unfortunately, 46% of these patients initially received an alternative diagnosis, the most common of which was femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), and a delay in diagnosis of >6 months occurred in 43% of patients. The authors note that concerns regarding radiation exposure have led some clinicians to order MRI rather than CT when evaluating pediatric hip disorders, but this study found that identifying an OO nidus with MRI was not as accurate as doing so with CT.

Regarding treatment, among the 41 patients who ultimately underwent percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to treat OO, 93% achieved complete post-RFA symptom resolution. Complications from RFA occurred in 7% of patients who underwent the procedure.

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One response to “Don’t Overlook Possible Osteoid Osteoma in Kids with Hip Pain”

  1. Ludwig Meiss says :

    Very interesting.
    My question: Did the authors notice that coxa magna developed in the younger children and to what extent (Sink EL, Bucholz RW. Coxa magna in a nonoperatively treated osteoid osteoma of the femoral neck. Orthopedics. 2004 Jul;27(7):777-9)?
    Cartilaginous hypertrophy of the femoral head can well be appreciated in MRI as has been shown in Perthes’ disease (Singerhoff, S. – http://ediss.sub.uni-hamburg.de/volltexte/2008/3573/pdf/Doktorarbeit_Morbus_Perthes.pdf).
    LM

    Like

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