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FTC Gets Injunction Against Predatory Publisher

FTC LogoAccording to a recent report on Retraction Watch, one day after OrthoBuzz posted an article about predatory publishers, a federal court ordered Srinubabu Gedela, CEO of OMICS Group and two sister companies, to stop what the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) said in an August 2016 lawsuit were deceptive business practices related to journal publishing. On its website, OMICS claims to publish “700+ open access journals.”

In issuing the preliminary injunction, US District Court Judge Gloria Navarro found evidence supporting the FTC’s claims that OMICS misled readers about whether articles had been peer-reviewed, hid publishing fees until after papers had been accepted, and presented misleading impact-factor data.

Under the preliminary injunction, OMICS will still be able to publish journals; the injunction relates only to specific “misrepresentations.” Gregory Ashe, a senior attorney at the FTC, told Retraction Watch that “nothing in this order goes to what [OMICS] can or can’t publish in terms of content. This is about how they are soliciting would-be academics to publish in their journals.”

If the FTC learns from academic consumers that OMICS is violating this injunction, the commission would then have to file a contempt-of-court motion. If you feel you have been victimized by unfair or deceptive business practices in academic publishing, you can contact the FTC’s Consumer Response Center at 1-877-382-4357.

Jason Miller, JBJS Executive Publisher
Lloyd Resnick, JBJS Developmental Editor

JBJS Case Connector to Be Indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed

JBJS_PL_Case_Connector_RGBThe National Library of Medicine has accepted JBJS Case Connector for indexing in MEDLINE/PubMed.

Launched in July 2011 and co-edited by Thomas W. Bauer, MD and Ronald W. Lindsey, MD, JBJS Case Connector compiles thousands of orthopaedic case reports, empowering surgeons to find cases similar to theirs, to identify emerging trends, and to distinguish between truly rare cases and repeated, related instances of a larger problem. Using this unique online journal, surgeons can find the commonalities between cases and filter case information by many important variables to provide the best possible care for orthopaedic patients.

In addition, monthly “Case Connections” essays explore the clinical relationships between recent articles and prior case reports in the wider orthopaedic literature, helping surgeons to identify potential patterns. And JBJS Case Connector Image Quizzes” provide interactive challenges based on JBJS case-report images, featuring in-depth discussions of relevant ideas and concepts.

If you are not already a JBJS Case Connector subscriber, click here to learn more.

Jason Miller
Executive Publisher

Authors from High-Income Countries Falling Prey to Predatory Publishers

Nature Comment CaptureIt’s estimated that as many as 8,000 predatory journals—which eschew scientific integrity in favor of profits—now exist and that they “publish” a total of more than 400,000 items annually. Conventional wisdom says that researcher-authors who become prey for these journals reside predominantly in the developing world. However, a recent commentary in Nature summarizing findings from an analysis of nearly 2,000 biomedical articles in more than 200 journals thought to be predatory, found that 57% of the corresponding authors hailed from high- and upper-middle-income countries. In fact, corresponding authors in the US—including some from Harvard University, the University of Texas, and the Mayo Clinic—produced more articles in this sample than any other country except India.

We have heard anecdotal reports of relatively experienced US authors being duped into submitting to predatory journals, only to find that, once aware of the situation, they had no recourse by which to withdraw or extract their work.

“In our view, publishing in predatory journals is unethical,” the Nature commentators say, emphasizing that everyone in the research chain—authors, publishers, institutions, and funders—has a responsibility to prevent research from appearing in such journals. The controversial online list of journals and publishers that were potentially, probably, or possibly predatory compiled by university librarian Jeffrey Beall was taken down earlier this year, but according to the commentary, authors can still spot potentially predatory journals by looking out for the following characteristics:

  • Article processing fees < $150
  • Spelling and grammatical errors on the journal’s website
  • Overly broad scope
  • Language that targets authors more than readers
  • Promises of rapid publication
  • Submission of manuscripts via email

For their part, say the commentators, research institutions and funders should train researchers in sound journal-selection practices and carefully audit where grantees and faculty are published by checking journal titles against the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).

Jason Miller, JBJS Executive Publisher
Lloyd Resnick, JBJS Developmental Editor

JBJS Reviews to Be Indexed in MEDLINE/PubMed

JBJS_PL_Reviews_RGB.pngThe National Library of Medicine has accepted JBJS Reviews for indexing in MEDLINE/PubMed.

Launched in November 2013 and edited by Thomas A. Einhorn, MD and a distinguished editorial board, JBJS Reviews is an innovative, continuously published online review journal from the publishers of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Each weekly posting of JBJS Reviews content updates the orthopaedic community on important topics in a concise, time-saving manner. Comprehensive reviews, special features, and integrated CME provide musculoskeletal clinicians with valuable perspectives on surgical practice and the latest advances in the field within twelve subspecialty areas.

If you are not already a JBJS Reviews subscriber, click here to learn more.

Jason Miller
Executive Publisher

Introducing JBJS Open Access

JBJS-Logo-OpenAccess-RGB.jpgThe Editors of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery are pleased to announce the launch of JBJS Open Access. This new online-only journal gives authors an open-access option bolstered by the outstanding service and brand of excellence that JBJS has delivered for more than 125 years. And readers worldwide will benefit from expanded access to the best clinical and basic-science content about musculoskeletal health and injury care.

JBJS Open Access Co-editors Dr. Eng Lee and Dr. Robin Richards are not only expert basic-science and clinical researchers, but together they have more than 60 years of experience in scholarly publishing.

Click here for more information about this latest step in our continuing effort to meet the evolving needs of authors and readers.

Marc Swiontkowski, MD
Editor-in-Chief

Jason Miller
Publisher

JBJS: Highest 2015 Impact Factor Among Ortho Journals

JBJS-TheJournal_CMYK.jpg

For the second year in a row, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS) has topped the field of orthopaedic journals in Impact Factor (IF). The Impact Factor measures the citation performance of a journal over a two-year period.

According to data from the 2015 edition of Journal Citation Reports (JCR), the JBJS Impact Factor is 5.163—the only orthopaedic journal to have an IF above 5.0. JBJS articles were cited a total of 3,268 times during 2013 and 2014, a 10.5% increase relative to the prior two-year period. In addition, The Journal’s five-year Impact Factor, an even more robust representation of sustained impact, was 5.372.

Although the Impact Factor is just one metric by which The Journal’s influence on musculoskeletal care is measured, our highest-in-the-field number is a testament to the ceaselessly hard working editors, reviewers, and authors who are responsible for the practice-changing content we publish.

For those of you interested in revisiting the most influential work in orthopaedics, according to JCR data, here are the top-three cited JBJS articles published in 2013-2014:

Jason Miller, JBJS Executive Publisher

Marathon Bombing Anniversary: Reflection, Gratitude, Hope

SpecialReportII-Cover-Final.jpgThree years ago today, the 2013 Boston Marathon was stolen from the athletes and the city by two terrorist bombs, which led to four deaths and hundreds of injuries. In March 2014, in conjunction with our friends at the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT), JBJS published It Takes a Team, a special report on the emergency preparedness, long-term care, and outcomes for many of those caught up in the Marathon bombings. This report is available online for free.

Not a single bombing victim who reached a hospital alive on April 15, 2013 died, a stunning result of years of preparation and teamwork. It Takes a Team provides a behind-the-scenes look at how the level 1 trauma centers involved that day ensured that their staffs had the emotional backing, resources, and systems in place so they could focus on their seriously injured patients.

As runners and spectators prepare for the 2016 Boston Marathon, we remember those we lost, those who survived, and the countless number of people who are helping those affected face the future with hope and dignity. We also thank the many people whose dedication to disaster-preparedness helps ensure that the 2016 and forthcoming Boston Marathons will go on.

Jason Miller

Executive Publisher, JBJS

The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery Impact Factor Highest Among Orthopaedic Journals

Last week, Thomson Reuters released the 2014 edition of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). This annual report includes several journal performance metrics, the best known of which is certainly the Impact Factor. The Impact Factor measures the citation performance of journal articles over a two-year period.

Like all metrics, the Impact Factor has its strengths and weaknesses, its champions and detractors. At JBJS, we are focused on a range of metrics, including the quality of articles submitted to us for publication, author satisfaction, and direct reader feedback and engagement.

Having said that, we wish to acknowledge the painstaking work by our Editor-in-Chief, Editorial Board, reviewers, and authors who contributed to a second straight year of dramatic growth in our Impact Factor, which increased 22.5% to 5.280 (from 4.309). That’s the highest Impact Factor among the 72 orthopaedic journals included in the JCR.

We’re proud that JBJS is having a steadily increasing influence as a source of orthopaedic information. Our ultimate goal remains the same, however – to have a positive impact on surgical expertise, clinical outcomes, and patient care.

–Mady Tissenbaum, Publisher, JBJS

Publisher’s Note: Launch of PRE-val supports “Excellence Through Peer Review”

A year ago we debuted the “peer-review statement” in The Journal to emphasize our commitment to pre-publication peer review and to the rigorous, double-blind peer-review process that is integral to our editorial standards.

Today we are happy to announce our participation in PRE-val, the flagship service offered by PRE (Peer Review Evaluation). Our readers will notice the PRE-val badge above the article title for most JBJS articles published on our website in the past 12 months. Clicking on the badge reveals the PRE-val window, which provides detail about the peer review for that particular article. We know that your confidence in the reliability of the information published in The Journal will be increased by the enhanced transparency of our peer-review process.

As a result of the commitment to peer review shared by JBJS and PRE, our Board of Trustees approved the acquisition of PRE in 2014. We are excited about this launch, and we look forward to the implementation of this valuable service on the sites of our partner publishers over the coming months. You can learn more about PRE here. Of course, we welcome your feedback; please let us know what you think of this initiative by writing to us at info@jbjs.org.

Medical publishing continues to evolve-sometimes to keep up with technology, sometimes due to financial constraints, and, unfortunately, sometimes in ways that make some of us uncomfortable-but readers of JBJS can be assured that our commitment to peer review and the quality it helps us to achieve will not waver. “Excellence Through Peer Review” will always remain a critical element of our core mission.

–Mady Tissenbaum, Publisher, JBJS

Publisher’s Note: Leaving Behind a Stronger Journal and a Stronger Organization

One measure of success for leaders is whether the organization they’ve led is stronger upon their departure. That’s a responsibility I’ve taken seriously for nearly 5 years as CEO/Publisher of STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc.

In the near future, I will be leaving STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc. to become Publisher at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which publishes the journal Science, along with Science: Translational Medicine, Science: Signaling, and Science: Advances.

While I’m sad to leave my colleagues and this audience, I’m happy to report that over the last 5 years, STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc. has improved and grown in a number of ways:

  • This year, The Journal’s impact factor increased nearly 33% to its highest level ever, while The Journal remains the most-read journal in the specialty.
  • Our new review journal, JBJS Reviews, is already one of the top online journal destinations in the field.
  • The new JBJS Recertification Course has proven popular and effective with surgeons preparing for their maintenance-of-certification exams.
  • JBJS Case Connector is improving clinical awareness and acumen on a monthly basis, with “Case Connections” synthesizing old and new information and “Watches & Warnings” alerting the field to emerging trends.
  • With a growing video library, JBJS Essential Surgical Techniques continues to provide in-depth, step-by-step guidance on new surgical techniques, and plans to take practical surgical video to a new level in 2015.

With an excellent editorial team led by our new Editor-in-Chief, Marc Swiontkowski, MD, these journal and educational products are poised for long-term success.

In addition to improving and extending its core products, STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc., has diversified into new areas, adding important tools to the scientific literature, products emphasizing quality evidence and peer review. SocialCite, which allows feedback on the quality and appropriateness of journal citations, has major publishers participating in its pilot phase. PRE-val, which brings increased transparency and accountability to peer review, is also generating significant interest across the sciences.

It has been an honor working with the superb staff and editors at STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc., as well as serving the orthopaedic community – orthopaedic surgeons, physical therapists, physician assistants, and others – over the last 5 years. Thank you.