Tag Archive | Peer Review Week

Elite Reviewer Spotlight: Samer Hasan

JBJS is pleased to highlight our Elite Reviewers. The Elite Reviewers Program recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. All JBJS reviewers help us maintain the highest standards for quality orthopaedic publishing.

Name: Samer Hasan, MD

Affiliation: Mercy Health – Cincinnati Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center

Years in practice: 19

How did you begin reviewing for other journals and for JBJS in particular?

My senior partners were doing it and so I got hooked. In the case of JBJS, I knew Dr. Andy Green and he knew me, and he began inviting me to review for the journal.

What is your top piece of advice for those reviewers who aspire to reach Elite status?

Accept the invitations whenever possible, then read the manuscript carefully and try and understand the context and the methods. Don’t get too caught up in the minutiae.

Aside from orthopaedic manuscripts, what have you been reading lately?

Just finished reading Malcolm Gladwell’s Outliers. Very provocative.

Learn more about the JBJS Elite Reviewers program.

Elite Reviewer Spotlight: Antonia Chen

In celebration of Peer Review Week, JBJS is pleased to present the first in a series of profiles highlighting our Elite Reviewers. The Elite Reviewers Program recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. All JBJS reviewers help us maintain the highest standards for quality orthopaedic publishing.

Name: Antonia F. Chen, MD, MBA

Affiliation: Brigham and Women’s Hospital / Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Years in practice: 5

How did you begin reviewing for other journals and for JBJS in particular?

As a resident, one of my attendings asked me to review for a different journal given my interest in research.   The guidelines for reviewers were incredibly helpful, and I initially spent days reviewing a study trying to critically analyze it and provide constructive feedback. Subsequently, I met Dr. Tom Bauer at a meeting, and given my research interests, he invited me to review an article for JBJS. It’s been an incredible privilege to review for JBJS, and the critical thinking skills developed as a reviewer have helped me become a better writer.

What is your top piece of advice for those reviewers who aspire to reach Elite status?

The more you practice reviewing, the more intuitive it becomes; try to do as many reviews as possible. I like to read an article twice – once to get the general gestalt of an article to understand if/how everything ties together, then a second time to critically analyze the article and try to find loopholes in the article. By doing so, I am able to understand the big picture before getting into the details of a manuscript.

Aside from orthopaedic manuscripts, what have you been reading lately?

I recently read The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up. I have so many changes to make!

Learn more about the JBJS Elite Reviewers program.

JBJS Elite Reviewers

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JBJS Reviewers are key to The Journal’s ability to publish the highest quality of evidence-based information, to advance research, and to enhance the quality of care for orthopaedic patients. The JBJS Elite Reviewers Program publicly recognizes our best reviewers for their outstanding efforts. We hope that the Program and its reviewer benefits will encourage all reviewers to aspire to meet the program requirements.

Reviewers who review 4 or more manuscripts per year, rarely decline an invitation to review a manuscript (responding within 48 hours), and complete highly graded reviews within 1 week are eligible for the program. Elite Reviewers receive the following benefits in recognition of their exemplary performance:

  • No submission fees for papers of which the reviewer is the first author (for 12 months)
  • Free CME credits for all reviews
  • Free online access to all JBJS publications
  • A letter to the reviewer’s department head from JBJS Editor-in-Chief, Marc Swiontkowski, MD, recognizing and commending his/her good work
  • Name recognition on the JBJS Elite Reviewers Program Web page and on the masthead of The Journal

For JBJS Consultant Reviewer Guidelines, visit http://bit.ly/2cWvYvc.

To learn how you can be a better reviewer visit http://bit.ly/2cRt1hY.

Here is the current list of JBJS Elite Reviewers:

Steven P. Arnoczky
George Babis
Ryan Calfee
Antonia F. Chen
Charles Cornell
Charles  Cox
John M. Cuckler
Thomas A. DeCoster
Lawrence Dorr
Freddie H. Fu
H. Kerr  Graham
Greg Guyton
Edward Joseph Harvey
James A. Keeney
Mark C. Lee
Stephen Li
Leisel D. Masson
Michael D. McKee
Omer Mei-Dan
Robert  Pilliar
Matt Provencher
Dino  Samartzis
Andrew Jason Schoenfeld
Edward M. Schwarz
Howard Joel Seeherman
George H. Thompson
Andre  van Wijnen
J. Michael Wiater
David Wong
Adolph J. Yates

 

Peer Review Week: Day 4

JBJS is helping celebrate Peer Review Week 2016 by formally recognizing some of its top reviewers for their contributions. Each day during Peer Review Week 2016, JBJS will profile three different top reviewers on OrthoBuzz. The week will culminate with a listing of our current Elite Reviewers.

Today, let’s meet Harry McKellop, Gordon Groh, and Philipp Moroder:

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Harry McKellop, PhD
UCLA

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
It helps to keep me informed of the latest accomplishments in research; I usually
am able to suggest ways for the authors to improve their manuscripts; in the end,
it is a benefit to the orthopaedic community and the patients.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I am a “retired” emeritus professor; but I always considered reviewing
for JBJS as an enjoyable way for giving  back to the profession.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
The research and clinical papers provide valuable information and guidelines
for improving the quality of care to the patients.

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Gordon Groh, MD
Mission Health

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Reviewing offers me the opportunity to “make a bigger impact.” Changing the paradigms for patient care affects entire populations of individuals and improves outcomes for everyone.  JBJS leads the effort to study, report, understand and improve musculoskeletal disease processes, and I am delighted to play a role.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Giving back is an inherent part of the contract which each of us is bound to as part of our training process.  Doing the right thing is never easy or convenient, but the rewards always outweigh the inconvenience.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS creates a landscape which is both permanent and evolving.  The Journal creates a permanent electronic record of our current thoughts regarding musculoskeletal disease and produces a template for understanding that which is ever-changing.

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Philipp Moroder, MD
Charitè Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The JBJS is a top-notch Journal which features high-quality manuscripts. Additionally, the editorial staff is great and puts
a lot of effort into even further improving the content quality.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Even though my schedule is pretty busy, I try my best to “fit-in” the JBJS reviews since to me it is a great honour to serve as a reviewer for
the JBJS.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS is probably one of the orthopaedic journals with  the most “clinical
impact.”Due to its high publication standards and excellent content,
it is a great source for information on what is new in the field of orthopedics
and offers ideas and solutions for the improvement of our daily patient care.

Peer Review Week: Day 3

JBJS is helping celebrate Peer Review Week 2016 by formally recognizing some of its top reviewers for their contributions. Each day during Peer Review Week 2016, JBJS will profile three different top reviewers on OrthoBuzz. The week will culminate with a listing of our Elite Reviewers for the first half of 2016.

Today, let’s meet Chad Mather, Carola van Eck, and David Kovacevic:

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Chad Mather, MD
Duke Health

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
I always look forward to reviewing articles for JBJS as they are always interesting
and related to my area of expertise.The articles are typically well written so I
am able to focus on the quality of the methods and direction of the discussion.
This makes it an enjoyable and stimulating experience.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
It is a challenge but I usually read them while riding my indoor cycle.
The two work together to keep me fit and not too far behind in my reviews!
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
Impact factor aside, JBJS is the most credible and prestigious orthopaedic
journal.  Articles published in JBJS will always be highly read, cited and respected.
JBJS has a role in not only ensuring the scientific methods are correct
but also to choose articles that lead our field into the future.

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Carola van Eck, MD
Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
I love that I could be the first person reading about the latest and greatest
breakthroughs in orthopaedic surgery.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
Peer reviewing is fun, but can take a substantial amount of time. Luckily,
you get faster at it as you gain more experience. Usually I find time
between my cases to work on peer reviews.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
I believe JBJS continues to be a top journal in the field of orthopaedics. Its
Impact Factor has consistently been amongst the highest in the field,
proving the journal will have a huge role in shaping the future or orthopaedics.

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David Kovacevic, MD
Yale University

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Opportunity to review manuscripts that have the potential to change the way we practice orthopaedics.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
It is a privilege to be a reviewer for the leading orthopaedic journal in the world so finding time to help the section editors is a top priority.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
Providing orthopaedic surgeons and musculoskeletal providers with the best evidence-based medicine by integrating basic science research with clinical expertise to enhance patient outcomes.

Peer Review Week: Day 2

JBJS is helping celebrate Peer Review Week 2016 by formally recognizing some of its top reviewers for their contributions. Each day during Peer Review Week 2016, JBJS will profile three different top reviewers on OrthoBuzz. Today, let’s meet Gwo-Chin Lee, Michelle Ghert, and Michael McKee:

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Gwo-Chin Lee, MD
University of Pennsylvania

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
It gives me a pulse of all of the interesting and hot topics of research occurring in our field and helps me focus my own research initiatives and clinical practice.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I make it a priority as best as I can to review for the journal.  I see it as not only a service and a way to give back, but also an educational opportunity for me.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
The journal is the premier orthopaedic publication and forum for orthopaedic research.  As it moves onto other educational ventures, it will continue to be a vehicle for the orthopaedic community to communicate, disseminate, and innovate

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Michelle Ghert, MD
McMaster University

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
The work is interesting and helps me keep up with knowledge in my field. I also feel that reviewing is an important service to the academic community.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I set aside some time on my research days.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS is an important source of knowledge dissemination in orthopaedics and a forum for advanced research methodology.

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Michael McKee, MD
University of Toronto

What do you like best about reviewing for JBJS?
Reviewing keeps me abreast of the latest clinical and research developments.
How do you find time to review for JBJS?
I dedicate a set time each week for reviews.
What do you see as JBJS’ role in shaping the future of orthopaedics?
JBJS is the premier journal for orthopaedics, adaptable and flexible, and it will continue to flourish in this.