What’s New in Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery 2020

Every month, JBJS publishes a review of the most pertinent and impactful studies published in the orthopaedic literature during the previous year in 13 subspecialties. Click here for a collection of all such OrthoBuzz specialty-update summaries.

This month, author Peter S. Rose, MD summarized the 5 most compelling findings from the 40 studies highlighted in the December 16, 2020 “What’s New in Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery.”

Primary Bone Tumors
–A retrospective analysis of data from the Euro-EWING99 trial1 is probably the most thorough examination to date of local tumor-control options in Ewing’s sarcoma of the pelvis–a difficult and controversial condition. The authors conclude with a recommendation for aggressive surgery and radiation in many patients, which goes beyond what most North American centers provide.

Metastatic Tumors
–Anderson et al. validate a fracture-risk calculating app2 that provides immediate clinical guidance on the risk of fracture and the role for surgery in patients with skeletal metastases. It is an early example of applying digital technology to provide real-time, individualized clinical guidance.

Phantom Limb Pain
–Alexander et al. provide an excellent early report of a new surgical technique3 (targeted muscle reinnervation) and a focused rehabilitation protocol to decrease phantom limb pain and maximize function after oncologic amputations.

Soft-Tissue Sarcomas
–After analyzing >1,600 patients treated for a soft-tissue sarcoma, Bedi et al. put forth a nomogram4 to predict postoperative wound complications, the single most frequent surgical complication in this population. The finding that BMI, tumor location, and timing of radiation are associated with the risk of wound complications is clinically relevant to all surgeons who treat these patients.

Carcinogenesis from Radiation Exposure
–This thought-provoking study predicted a lifetime fatal cancer risk of 3.5% from medical imaging studies used in the care of polytrauma patients. While the study focused on trauma patients rather than oncology patients, the striking results may have implications for how we use CT imaging to follow tumor patients as well.

References

  1. Andreou D, Ranft A, Gosheger G, Timmermann B, Ladenstein R, Hartmann W, Bauer S, Baumhoer D, van den Berg H, Dijkstra PDS, Dürr HR, Gelderblom H, Hardes J, Hjorth L, Kreyer J, Kruseova J, Leithner A, Scobioala S, Streitbürger A, Tunn PU, Wardelmann E, Windhager R, Jürgens H, Dirksen U; GPOH-Euro-EWING99 Consortium. Which factors are associated with local control and survival of patients with localized pelvic Ewing’s sarcoma? A retrospective analysis of data from the Euro-EWING99 trial. Clin Orthop Relat Res.2020 Feb;478(2):290-302.
  2. Anderson AB, Wedin R, Fabbri N, Boland P, Healey J, Forsberg JA. External validation of PATHFx version 3.0 in patients treated surgically and nonsurgically for symptomatic skeletal metastases. Clin Orthop Relat Res.2020 Apr;478(4):808-18.
  3. Alexander JH, Jordan SW, West JM, Compston A, Fugitt J, Bowen JB, Dumanian GA, Pollock R, Mayerson JL, Scharschmidt TJ, Valerio IL. Targeted muscle reinnervation in oncologic amputees: early experience of a novel institutional protocol. J Surg Oncol.2019 Sep;120(3):348-58. Epub 2019 Jun 13.
  4. Bedi M, Ethun CG, Charlson J, Tran TB, Poultsides G, Grignol V, Howard JH, Tseng J, Roggin KK, Chouliaras K, Votanopoulos K, Cullinan D, Fields RC, Cardona K, King DM. Is a nomogram able to predict postoperative wound complications in localized soft-tissue sarcomas of the extremity? Clin Orthop Relat Res.2020 Mar;478(3):550-9.

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