Tag Archive | Orthopedic

Risk Reduction Compared with Access to Care: The Trade-Off of Enforcing a BMI Eligibility Criterion for Joint Replacement

Morbidly obese patients with severe osteoarthritis benefit from successful total joint arthroplasty. However, morbid obesity increases the risk of complications. https://bit.ly/2qpfj8w #JBJS

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Clinical Outcomes Following the Latarjet Procedure in Contact and Collision Athletes

Few studies have evaluated the success of the Latarjet procedure for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability in the contact or collision athlete. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the return-to-sport and functional results of the Latarjet procedure in this select group. https://bit.ly/2I2hB50 #JBJS

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Teaching Patients How to Reduce a Shoulder Dislocation

BHM self-administered technique can be used as a first-line technique in the emergency department for reducing shoulder dislocation. https://goo.gl/gwMt16 #JBJS

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Video Summary: Teaching Patients How to Reduce a Shoulder Dislocation

BHM self-administered technique can be used as a first-line technique in the emergency department for reducing shoulder dislocations. https://goo.gl/CaCwnx #JBJSVideoSummaries #JBJS

Webinar on March 29 – Spondylolysis in Adolescents: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes

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Low back pain is not typically thought to be a pediatric issue; however, this condition occurs in 33% of adolescents each year—a rate similar to that seen in adults. The most common identifiable cause of low back pain in the adolescent is spondylolysis, a defect in the pars interarticularis. How is this condition best diagnosed and treated? Do oblique radiographs help diagnose spondylolysis in adolescents? What kind of short- and long-term clinical outcomes can adolescents—and especially adolescent athletes—diagnosed with acute spondylolysis expect to have? What factors might predict long-term outcomes?

These important and clinically applicable questions will be addressed during a complimentary LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS).

JBJS presenter, Peter Passias, MD, will discuss findings from a retrospective study of adolescents with and without L5 spondylolysis to address whether oblique radiographic views add value in the diagnosis of this cause of low back pain. This paper specifically addresses whether the diagnostic benefit of four-view studies outweighs the additional cost and radiation exposure, especially for young people.

JOSPT co-author Mitchell Selhorst, DPT, OCS, will share the results of a retrospective review of acute spondylolytic injuries in young athletes. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes for these patients and identifies significant predictors of these outcomes.

Moderated by JBJS Deputy Editor Andrew J. Schoenfeld, MD, who specializes in spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and spinal surgery, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators, Chris Bono, MD,from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Michael Allen, PT, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Space is limited, so Register Now.

Excess Opioid Medication Video Summary

Postoperative pain management in orthopaedic surgery accounts for a substantial portion of opioid medications prescribed in the United States. https://goo.gl/rZaM3y 

Fixation Costs for Distal Radial Fracture

There is no consensus on the optimal fixation method for patients who require a surgical procedure for distal radial fractures. We used cost-effectiveness analyses to determine which of 3 modalities offers the best value. https://goo.gl/mos4dc 

Excess Prescription Opioids

Postoperative management in orthopaedic surgery accounts for a substantial portion of medications prescribed in the United States. https://goo.gl/H93hya 

JBJS Classics: Cuff-Tear Arthropathy Spurred Shoulder Prosthetic Technology

JBJS Classics Logo.pngOrthoBuzz regularly brings you a current commentary on a “classic” article from The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. These articles have been selected by the Editor-in-Chief and Deputy Editors of The Journal because of their long-standing significance to the orthopaedic community and the many citations they receive in the literature. Our OrthoBuzz commentators highlight the impact that these JBJS articles have had on the practice of orthopaedics. Please feel free to join the conversation by clicking on the “Leave a Comment” button in the box to the left.

Charles Neer II , a true pioneer in shoulder surgery, coined the term “cuff-tear arthropathy” in 1977. In a landmark 1983 JBJS publication, Dr. Neer, with coauthors Craig and Fukuda (both of whom became internationally recognized experts in shoulder surgery), reported on the pathophysiology and treatment of this previously little-recognized condition that was associated with long-standing massive rotator cuff tears.

Neer’s early work with total shoulder arthroplasty, also reported in JBJS, included a small cohort of patients with cuff-tear arthropathy. In the 1983 article on cuff-tear arthropathy, Neer and his coauthors described the pathologic presentation and treatment with total shoulder arthroplasty, along with a proposed pathophysiologic mechanism. They noted that, although it was a difficult procedure, their preferred treatment was “total shoulder replacement with rotator cuff reconstruction and special rehabilitation.”

Between 1975 and 1983, they surgically treated only 26 patients. Others later recognized that total shoulder replacement was associated with early glenoid failure and recommended treatment with humeral hemiarthroplasty.1 With either approach, success was limited by rotator cuff deficiency and dysfunction. The results were variable, with a small proportion having good outcomes and others achieving some pain relief and limited functional improvement.

Although it was not the first attempt at a reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA), Grammont developed an innovative design with improved implant technology and biomechanics to treat massive rotator cuff tears.2 This solved the biomechanical problem that resulted from a deficient rotator cuff and forever revolutionized the care of cuff-deficient shoulders. The Delta 3 prosthesis became available in Europe in the early 1990s but was not widely available in the US until 2004, when it was approved by the FDA.

Initially developed, approved, and used exclusively for cuff-tear arthropathy, early clinical success led to utilization for other conditions with deficient or dysfunctional rotator cuffs, including pseudoparalysis, revision shoulder arthroplasty, acute proximal humerus fractures, fracture sequelae, and chronic glenohumeral dislocations. The results have been so good that the indications have expanded beyond the initial recommendations for use only in elderly low-demand patients. Initial concerns were mollified by the apparent longevity and reported survivorship. Subsequently, there has been such a huge increase in utilization that RSA is approaching 50 percent of the US market share and some of the international market. The implications of expanded indications and increased utilization are yet to be seen.

In 1983, Neer and coauthors reported on what was then a relatively uncommon degenerative condition of the shoulder. Today, rotator cuff-deficient shoulders are much more common and can be better treated due to advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology and biomechanics of the condition, as well as advances in shoulder arthroplasty technology.

Andrew Green, MD
JBJS Deputy Editor

References
1. Franklin JL, Barrett WP, Jackins SE, Matsen FA 3rd. Glenoid loosening in total shoulder
arthroplasty. Association with rotator cuff deficiency. J Arthroplasty. 1988;3(1):39-46.

2. Grammont PM, Baulot E. Delta shoulder prosthesis for rotator cuff rupture. Orthopedics. 1993 Jan;16(1):65-8