Tag Archive | webinar

Webinar on March 29 – Spondylolysis in Adolescents: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes

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Low back pain is not typically thought to be a pediatric issue; however, this condition occurs in 33% of adolescents each year—a rate similar to that seen in adults. The most common identifiable cause of low back pain in the adolescent is spondylolysis, a defect in the pars interarticularis. How is this condition best diagnosed and treated? Do oblique radiographs help diagnose spondylolysis in adolescents? What kind of short- and long-term clinical outcomes can adolescents—and especially adolescent athletes—diagnosed with acute spondylolysis expect to have? What factors might predict long-term outcomes?

These important and clinically applicable questions will be addressed during a complimentary LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS).

JBJS presenter, Peter Passias, MD, will discuss findings from a retrospective study of adolescents with and without L5 spondylolysis to address whether oblique radiographic views add value in the diagnosis of this cause of low back pain. This paper specifically addresses whether the diagnostic benefit of four-view studies outweighs the additional cost and radiation exposure, especially for young people.

JOSPT co-author Mitchell Selhorst, DPT, OCS, will share the results of a retrospective review of acute spondylolytic injuries in young athletes. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes for these patients and identifies significant predictors of these outcomes.

Moderated by JBJS Deputy Editor Andrew J. Schoenfeld, MD, who specializes in spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and spinal surgery, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators, Chris Bono, MD,from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Michael Allen, PT, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Space is limited, so Register Now.

JBJS Webinar: How to Prevent and Treat MSK Infections

MRSA Resistance.gifMusculoskeletal (MSK) infections are highly prevalent and potentially serious, and orthopaedists are frequently faced with preventing and treating them. Wherever or however they are acquired, these pathogen-based conditions are among the most challenging to address effectively.

On Monday, May 23, 2016 at 8:00 pm EDT, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery will present a complimentary webinar that includes findings from two recent JBJS studies that explore how best to prevent deep infections in lower-grade open fractures, and the most effective antibiotics for treating community-acquired hand infections.

Richard Jenkinson, MD will discuss findings from a cohort study that compared deep infection rates in patients with lower-grade open fractures who were treated with either immediate wound closure or delayed wound closure. Rick Tosti, MD will examine resistance patterns of specific antibiotics to MRSA infections of the hand in an urban population.

Moderated by musculoskeletal-infection expert Jonathan Schoenecker, MD, PhD, the webinar will also feature commentaries on the studies by Lawrence Marsh, MD and Isaac Thomsen, MD.

Click here to register.

JBJS Webinar Now On-Demand – Return to Sports after ACL Reconstruction

“When will I be able to play again?” Following ACL reconstruction surgery, that’s a question physical therapists and orthopaedic surgeons invariably hear—often repeatedly—from their athletically inclined patients.

The multiple factors that go into answering this difficult question are the subject of this complimentary webinar.

Current evidence suggests that approximately 50 to 60 percent of patients post ACL-reconstruction eventually return to sports at preinjury levels. But the timing of that return—and the many variables leading to it—create a series of challenging clinical decision points. This webinars explores the most relevant surgical, rehabilitative, and patient-centered factors that contribute to sound decisions in which surgeons, physical therapists, and patients participate fully.

Moderated by Robert Marx, MD, JBJS Associate Editor for Evidence-based Orthopaedics, this webinar focuses on two articles, one from each journal.

After the articles’ primary authors present their data, two additional return-to-sports experts add their perspectives to this body of research.

Moderator:

Robert Marx, MD

Presenting authors:

Freddie Fu, MD and Terese Chmielewski, PT, PhD, SCS

Commentators:

Kevin Wilk, PT, DPT, FAPTA and Kurt Spindler, MD

Register now!

This webinar is brought to you by the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery

JBJS/JOSPT Joint Webinar: Return to Sports after ACL Reconstruction

“When will I be able to play again?” Following ACL reconstruction surgery, that’s a question orthopaedic surgeons and physical therapists invariably hear—often repeatedly—from their athletically inclined patients.

The multiple surgical, rehabilitative, and patient-centered factors that go into answering this difficult question are the subject of this free webinar, hosted jointly by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS) and the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).

This webinar will focus on the following two articles, one from each journal:

•      Operative Treatment of Primary ACL Rupture in Adults (JBJS 2014; 96:685-94)
•      Return to Preinjury Sports Participation Following ACL Reconstruction: Contributions of Demographic, Knee Impairment, and Self-report                     Measures (JOSPT 2012; 42:893-901)
After the articles’ primary authors present their data, two additional return-to-sports experts will add their perspectives to this body of research. The audience will have the opportunity to ask questions of the presenters.

Sign up for the November 12th webinar today!

 

Rotator Cuff Repair—Does Healing Matter: A JBJS Webinar

What’s more important after rotator cuff repair: How the shoulder feels and functions or how it looks on an MRI or ultrasound?

Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction.  Operative repair is frequently performed with successful outcomes.

However, postoperative imaging studies reveal structural failures after such repairs in up to 90% of patients. The good news: many of those patients experience pain relief and improved function despite “failure.”

Two JBJS papers that shed new light on this and other rotator-cuff conundrums are the foci of this timely and insightful JBJS webinar:

Factors Affecting Outcome After Structural Failure of Repaired Rotator Cuff Repairs

Structural Integrity After Rotator Cuff Repair Does Not Correlate with Patient Function and Pain

Moderated by Andrew Green, MD, JBJS Deputy Editor for the Upper Extremity, this webinar will conclude with a live Q&A session, during which the audience can query the authors and commentators—and get answers—in real time.

Webinar attendees will hear from study authors Michael Khazzam, MD, and Jay D. Keener, MD. In addition, rotator cuff experts Scott Rodeo, MD, and Robert Tashjian, MD, will further analyze the findings from these studies and add perspectives from their own experience and research.

Register now to learn from this panel of experts and contribute to the dialogue—all from the convenience of your computer, smartphone, or tablet.

Register here for the Sept 22 webinar:

Moderator: Andrew Green, MD

Presenting authors: Jay D. Keener, MD, and Michael S. Khazzam, MD

Commentators: Scott Rodeo, MD, and Robert Tashjian, MD

Sponsored by:

Modernizing Medicine

Aspirin’s Effectiveness in VTE Prevention Varies by Procedure

“Deep vein thrombosis of the right leg” by James Heilman, MD – Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

A recent meta-analysis of eight randomized trials (1,408 total patients) compared aspirin to anticoagulants such as warfarin and dabigatran for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hip and knee arthroplasty and hip-fracture repair. The analysis found that the overall prophylactic power of these two medical approaches was essentially equal following major lower-extremity surgery. However, the comparison, appearing in the Journal of Hospital Medicine, found a slightly higher (but statistically nonsignificant) risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with aspirin following hip-fracture repair. Conversely, the risk of bleeding after hip-fracture surgery was lower with aspirin than with anticoagulants.

For additional insight into VTE prophylaxis, view the FREE recorded JBJS webinar “Preventing Arthroplasty-Associated Venous Thromboembolism.” Register here.

JBJS Website: #1 Among Orthopaedic Surgeons

According to the orthopaedic surgeon edition of Kantar Media’s Website Usage & Qualitative Evaluation study, JBJS.org ranks hands down as the #1 orthopaedic site that surgeons visit most often and spend the most time on. The Kantar study evaluates the opinions of orthopaedic surgeons on 29 professional websites, including 8 orthopaedic sites. Not only does JBJS.org rank number 1 among the other 7 orthopaedic sites in frequency of visits (4.7 times/month), the website ranks first among all 28 sites evaluated in terms of time per session (20.31 minutes). Additionally, JBJS.org ranks #1 in delivering quality clinical content and keeping surgeons informed of the latest practices and procedures. JBJS ties for first place in the category of information on drugs, devices, or professional services. Also noteworthy is the fact that JBJS Reviews, a new online review journal from JBJS launched in November 2013, has already taken over third place in time spent and number of site visits.

JBJS Webinar Series
JBJS has held multiple live webinar events on a wide variety of topics, and we are pleased to announce the expansion of the JBJS Webinar Series in 2014. Each webinar has proven to be a successful tool in educating, informing and engaging orthopaedic surgeons around the world. In 2014, JBJS is continuing this educational program through a new series of interactive online events.

Our webinars bring together groups of authors to present recently published scientific research and data, and they include commentary from guest experts. Live Q&A sessions follow the author and commentator presentations to provide the audience with the opportunity to further explore the concepts and data presented. Webinars continue to be available on-demand for several months after the event.

AVAILABLE ON-DEMAND (Previously Recorded Events)

Total Knee Arthroplasty Critical Decision Making: Socioeconomic and Clinical Considerations (June 10, 2014) – Moderated by Charles R. Clark, MD
Panelists/Authors: Kevin J. Bozic, MD and Thomas S. Thornhill, MD
Commentators: Daniel J. Berry, MD and Kevin Garvey, MD

Preventing Arthroplasty-Associated Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) (May 12, 2014) – Moderated by Thomas A. Einhorn, MD
Panelists/Authors: Clifford W. Colwell Jr, MD and John T. Schousboe, MD
Commentators: Vincent Pellegrini Jr, MD and Jay Lieberman, MD

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction (March 5, 2014) – Moderated by Mark Miller, MD
Panelists/Authors: Freddie Fu, MD and Christopher Kaeding, MD
Commentators: Brett Owens, MD and Darren L. Johnson, MD

Adhesive Capsulitis/Frozen Shoulder (December 2013) – Moderated by Andrew Green, MD
Presented in conjunction with the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy.
Panelists/Authors: George Murrell, MD, Martin J. Kelley, DPT, Jo Hannafin, MD, PhD, and Philip W. McClure, PT, PhD

Periprosthetic Joint Infection (October 2013) – Moderated by Charles R. Clark, MD
Panelists/Authors: Kevin J. Bozic, MD and Craig J. Della Valle, MD
Commentators: Javad Parvizi, MD, FRCS, and Geoffrey Tsaras, MD, MPH

Measuring Value in Orthopaedic Surgery (September 2013) – Moderated by James Herndon, MD
Panelist/Author: Kevin J. Bozic, MD
Commentators: David Jevsevar, MD and Jon J.P. Warner, MD
Editor, JBJS Reviews: Thomas A. Einhorn, MD