Tag Archive | JOPA

JOPA 2019 Writing Awards

Since 2016, The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery and JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) have awarded two $500 prizes to outstanding JOPA review articles or case studies written by authors who were PA students at the time of article submission.

The 2019 award winners for best articles by PA students produced high-quality literature reviews that address current and impactful topics. We recognized author Matthew Morrow, BA, PA-S out of Northwestern University for “The Effects of Cannabinoid Use on Acute Orthopaedic Pain: A Review of the Current Literature,” which showed that cannabis use provided little to no pain relief for acute musculoskeletal pain. The review also concluded that cannabis use while recovering from musculoskeletal trauma may be associated with an increased use of narcotics. The article suggests that cannabis use has a larger role for chronic rather than acute musculoskeletal pain.

Brittany Szabo, PA-S and Justin Gambini, MSPAS, PA-C, from Campbell University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, were recognized for “Ewing Sarcoma: A Review on Primary Bone Malignancy in Pediatrics and the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Challenges of Managing Ewing Sarcoma.” This article provided a comprehensive review of a “can’t miss” orthopaedic diagnosis, including clinical and diagnostic signs for orthopaedic providers to look for.

Congratulations to our 2019 PA student writing-award winners! We are offering two $500 awards again this year, so please encourage all of your PA students to submit an article for consideration! Deadline for submission is December 31, 2020.

And be on the lookout for an announcement about 2 additional 2019 JOPA Writing Award winners.

Dagan Cloutier, PA-C
Editor, JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants

Attention PAs and NPs: JBJS JOPA CME Membership

SnipImage

Access the most relevant peer-reviewed orthopaedic content, including unlimited CME, by purchasing a 1-year JBJS JOPA CME membership—for the limited-time special rate of $99.

Your JBJS JOPA CME membership includes the following essential ingredients for your professional development and education:

  • New JBJS Reviews CME every week
  • Full access to JBJS Reviews and JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA)
  • Monthly Image Quizzes
  • Annual PA Salary Survey
  • Physical Exam and Injection Video Library

With more than 50 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM available annually* with your membership, you can complete all your CME for under $100.

To obtain the special $99 rate, click here and enter code WHQ834AA at checkout.

*The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. JBJS designates each JBJS Reviews journal-based activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Are You Paying Your PAs Market Wages?

JOPA_Salary_Survey_Cover.pngGet the answer to that question and many more in the 2016 Salary and Call Survey, compiled by JOPA, the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants.

In addition to a US regional breakdown of average base salaries among PAs working in orthopaedics, the 2016 survey contains accurate, trending information from PAs about:

  • Hospital versus Private-Practice Salaries
  • Trends in Bonuses, Benefits, and Perks
  • Workload and Autonomy
  • Call Structures and Schedules
  • Job Satisfaction

The survey was conducted by email during November and December 2016. JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) sent an online survey to 3,056 JOPA subscribers. Three-hundred twenty (320) physician assistants in orthopaedics responded, representing a response rate of 10%. At a 95% confidence level, results are projected at a ±5.5% margin of error.

JBJS JOPA Image Quiz: Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

Lateral_Spine.pngThis month’s Image Quiz from the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) presents the case of a 55-year-old woman with neck pain and upper-extremity weakness after a motor vehicle accident that occurred 1 week prior, during which she sustained a whiplash injury.  She notes severe bilateral arm weakness, “clumsy hands,” and mild lower-extremity weakness with walking. The bilateral upper-extremity muscle groups have a strength of 3 of 5, and the lower-extremity muscle groups have a strength of 5 of 5. Sensation remains intact throughout the upper and lower extremities.

Select from among four choices as the most likely diagnosis:

  1. Central cord syndrome
  2. Brown-Séquard syndrome
  3. Anterior cord syndrome
  4. Posterior cord syndrome

JBJS JOPA Image Quiz: Lateral Clavicle Fracture

clou1.jpgThis month’s Image Quiz from the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) presents the case of a 64-year-old woman who fell out of bed while sleeping and landed directly on the lateral aspect of the right shoulder. Based on the image shown here and a Zanca view radiograph, she was diagnosed in the emergency room with a lateral clavicle fracture. After staying in a sling for about two weeks, the patient continued to have shoulder pain when using the arm with overhead activities and when sleeping on the shoulder at night.

Select from among four choices as the next best step in treatment: MRI to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments, open reduction/internal fixation, continued sling treatment until pain resolves, or transacromial wire fixation.

JBJS JOPA Image Quiz: 7-Year-Old Girl with an Injured Wrist

JOPA IQ Wrist Fracture.jpgThis month’s Image Quiz from the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) presents the case of a 7-year-old girl who sustained a wrist injury from a fall off of monkey bars. An initial lateral radiograph is shown here. Clinicians attempted a closed reduction and applied a long arm cast. At the 1-week follow-up visit, radiographs showed additional displacement and increased dorsal angulation.

Select from among five possible choices for the greatest predictor of fracture displacement in the setting of distal radial metaphyseal fractures: increased fracture obliquity, a cast index ratio of less than or equal to 0.7, short arm casting, an intact ulna, or increased initial displacement of the radius.

Fall Issue of JBJS JOPA Now Available

Fall_2016_JOPA_Cover.pngThe Fall 2016 JBJS JOPA is now available. To access the new issue, go to the JBJS JOPA website, click on the journal image to the right, and download the PDF. Topics include:

  • A Visual Guide to the Salter-Harris Pediatric Fracture Classification System
  • Perioperative Pain Management in the Chronic Opioid User
  • Radiation Safety for PAs in the Orthopaedic Operating Room
  • Recap of the monthly image quizzes, including November’s quiz on Distal Radial Metaphyseal Fractures.

With your JOPA subscription, you receive complimentary access to JBJS Reviews, which delivers new online review articles weekly, with a CME opportunity attached to each article.

Create your account and gain access to these important orthopaedic resources/opportunities:

JBJS JOPA Image Quiz: A 15-Year-Old Girl with Dislocated Patella

clou3_REV_9-13-16.jpgThis month’s Image Quiz from the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants(JOPA) presents the case of a teenage girl who dislocated her patella while playing volleyball. The quiz provides four postreduction images, two radiographs and two fat-suppressed MRI scans, and then readers are presented with two questions:

  • What is the next best step in this patient’s treatment?
  • Which concomitant condition does NOT cause an increased risk of patellar instability?

JBJS JOPA Image Quiz: 74-Year-Old Woman with Knee Pain

jopa-image-quiz_9_26_16This month’s Image Quiz from the JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) presents the case of a 74-year-old woman with a 2-month history of left knee pain. She was given an intra-articular knee injection for presumed osteoarthritis, which failed to provide any relief. At a follow-up visit, clinicians obtained the MRI shown here.

Pick among five possible diagnoses: secondary osteonecrosis, transient osteoporosis, spontaneous osteonecrosis, osteochondritis dissecans, or bone marrow edema lesion.

2016 JOPA Video Awards

VideoAward_TwitterIn addition to the recently announced JBJS Journal of Orthopaedics for Physician Assistants (JOPA) writing awards, JBJS is offering two additional $1,000 awards for the following:

  • Best Physical Exam Video by a certified, practicing PA or NP (suggested length of 10 to 15 minutes)
  • Best Injection Technique Video by a certified, practicing PA or NP (e.g., subacromial, knee, or trigger finger injection)

Please submit videos without accompanying text, except for the title and author(s).

Submit your video via the JOPA Editorial Manager submission site, and please include a signed Video License Agreement.

For complete information on submitting video to JOPA, including sample videos, click here.

Please address questions regarding the video or writing contests to jopaeditorial@jbjs.org.