Tag Archive | naproxen

Naproxen Effective for Preventing HO after Hip Arthroscopy

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a known complication of hip arthroplasty. A double-blF6.medium (2)ind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial by Beckmann et al. in the December 16, 2015 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery showed that prophylaxis with naproxen dramatically reduced the prevalence of HO after hip arthroscopy, without serious medication-related side effects. These findings bolster findings from previous retrospective investigations that showed large reductions in HO prevalence among those taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

The patients in the study took naproxen (500 mg) or a placebo twice a day for three weeks following arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement.  After one year, the prevalence of radiographically determined HO in patients randomized to the naproxen group was 4% versus 46% in the patients randomized to the placebo group, an 11-fold difference. While the potential for serious GI and renal side effects with NSAIDs is well-documented, in this study only minor adverse reactions to study medication were reported in 42% of those taking naproxen and in 35% of those taking placebo.

Noting that the clinical consequences of HO following hip arthroscopy are “largely undetermined,” the authors still suggest a role for HO prophylaxis “because it could reduce the risk of developing symptomatic HO or requiring revision surgery for HO excision.”

In an accompanying commentary, Sverre Loken praises the authors for the well-designed study, but he cautions that “clinically relevant HO is uncommon, and this has to be weighed against the risk of serious side effects caused by NSAIDs.” He also emphasizes the observation Beckmann et al. make in the last paragraph of their study: that “the lowest dose and shortest duration of NSAID prophylaxis that still prevent HO remain to be determined.”

Acute Low Back Pain: Adding Oxycodone to Naproxen Doesn’t Help

As if on cue, a just-published study in JAMA backed up the recent AAOS statement on opioids by finding that neither the opiate oxycodone nor the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril) is a helpful adjunct to naproxen for acute, nontraumatic, nonradicular low back pain.

The study randomized 323 emergency-department (ED) patients presenting with low back pain to receive a 10-day course of naproxen + placebo, naproxen + cyclobenzaprine, or naproxen + oxycodone/acetaminophen. The improvement in scores on the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire between the time of ED discharge and one week later was similar in all three groups. This finding led Journal Watch Emergency Medicine Associate Editor Daniel Pallin, MD to comment that “prescribing opioids for a condition that evidence-based consensus guidelines warn against can lead to abuse and addiction.”

Three New Knee Studies Yield Interesting Results

We stumbled upon three recent studies of knee osteoarthritis (OA) that shed interesting new light on a condition that all orthopaedists deal with.

–A “network” meta-analysis in the Annals of Internal Medicine looked at 137 randomized trials of OA treatments comprising more than 33,000 participants. Treatments analyzed included acetaminophen, diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, celecoxib, intra-articular (IA) steroids, IA hyaluronic acid, oral placebo, and IA placebo. For pain, all active treatments except acetaminophen yielded clinically significant improvement. IA hyaluronic acid came out on top for pain relief, although the authors postulated that an “integrated” placebo effect may explain that finding.

–A cost-modeling study in Arthritis Care & Research, co-authored by JBJS Deputy Editors for Methodology and Biostatistics Jeffrey Katz, MD and Elena Losina, PhD, revealed that the per-patient cost attributable to symptomatic knee OA over 28 years is $12,400. Any expanded indications for total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and a trend toward increased willingness among patients to undergo knee surgery will increase that cost. The researchers found that patients tried nonsurgical regimens for a mean of 13.3 years before opting for TKA, and they stress the need for more effective nonoperative therapies for knee OA.

–Wine drinkers, rejoice! A retrospective case-control study in Arthritis Research & Therapy found that people who drank four to six glasses of wine per week were less likely to develop knee OA than nondrinkers. Meanwhile, beer drinkers may want to switch to wine. The same study found that people who drank 8 to 19 half-pints of suds per week had an increased risk of developing knee OA. Researchers found no link between total alcohol consumption and risk of knee OA. The authors postulate that the resveratrol found in wine may be chondroprotective, and that the linkage between beer and increased blood levels of uric acid may explain the opposite finding. It’s wise to remember that studies investigating one or two dietary items can be less-than-definitive because they are usually retrospective, subject to recall bias, and do not account for complex interactions among many nutrients.