Tag Archive | Orthopaedic

Risk Reduction Compared with Access to Care: The Trade-Off of Enforcing a BMI Eligibility Criterion for Joint Replacement

Morbidly obese patients with severe osteoarthritis benefit from successful total joint arthroplasty. However, morbid obesity increases the risk of complications. https://bit.ly/2qpfj8w #JBJS

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Clinical Outcomes Following the Latarjet Procedure in Contact and Collision Athletes

Few studies have evaluated the success of the Latarjet procedure for recurrent anterior glenohumeral instability in the contact or collision athlete. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the return-to-sport and functional results of the Latarjet procedure in this select group. https://bit.ly/2I2hB50 #JBJS

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Teaching Patients How to Reduce a Shoulder Dislocation

BHM self-administered technique can be used as a first-line technique in the emergency department for reducing shoulder dislocation. https://goo.gl/gwMt16 #JBJS

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Video Summary: Teaching Patients How to Reduce a Shoulder Dislocation

BHM self-administered technique can be used as a first-line technique in the emergency department for reducing shoulder dislocations. https://goo.gl/CaCwnx #JBJSVideoSummaries #JBJS

Webinar on March 29 – Spondylolysis in Adolescents: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcomes

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Low back pain is not typically thought to be a pediatric issue; however, this condition occurs in 33% of adolescents each year—a rate similar to that seen in adults. The most common identifiable cause of low back pain in the adolescent is spondylolysis, a defect in the pars interarticularis. How is this condition best diagnosed and treated? Do oblique radiographs help diagnose spondylolysis in adolescents? What kind of short- and long-term clinical outcomes can adolescents—and especially adolescent athletes—diagnosed with acute spondylolysis expect to have? What factors might predict long-term outcomes?

These important and clinically applicable questions will be addressed during a complimentary LIVE webinar, hosted jointly by the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT) and The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS).

JBJS presenter, Peter Passias, MD, will discuss findings from a retrospective study of adolescents with and without L5 spondylolysis to address whether oblique radiographic views add value in the diagnosis of this cause of low back pain. This paper specifically addresses whether the diagnostic benefit of four-view studies outweighs the additional cost and radiation exposure, especially for young people.

JOSPT co-author Mitchell Selhorst, DPT, OCS, will share the results of a retrospective review of acute spondylolytic injuries in young athletes. This study reports long-term clinical outcomes for these patients and identifies significant predictors of these outcomes.

Moderated by JBJS Deputy Editor Andrew J. Schoenfeld, MD, who specializes in spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and spinal surgery, the webinar will include additional insights from expert commentators, Chris Bono, MD,from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and Michael Allen, PT, from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. The last 15 minutes will be devoted to a live Q&A session between the audience and panelists.

Space is limited, so Register Now.

Excess Opioid Medication Video Summary

Postoperative pain management in orthopaedic surgery accounts for a substantial portion of opioid medications prescribed in the United States. https://goo.gl/rZaM3y 

Fixation Costs for Distal Radial Fracture

There is no consensus on the optimal fixation method for patients who require a surgical procedure for distal radial fractures. We used cost-effectiveness analyses to determine which of 3 modalities offers the best value. https://goo.gl/mos4dc 

Excess Prescription Opioids

Postoperative management in orthopaedic surgery accounts for a substantial portion of medications prescribed in the United States. https://goo.gl/H93hya 

Maximizing Specialized Health Registries Under MIPS

Weisstein Headshot for O'BuzzOrthoBuzz occasionally receives posts from guest bloggers. This guest post comes from Jason Weisstein, MD, MPH, FACS.

I want to expand on my previous posts (Tips to Excel Under MIPS and  Why EHR Data & Analytics Matter) and focus on another differentiating factor when it comes to electronic health record (EHR) systems and your success with Medicare’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

The ability to interact with specialized health registries is another functionality your EHR system should have. Active engagement with a clinical data registry falls under the Advancing Care Information (ACI) component of MIPS. In general, having EHR-enabled access to such specialized health registries can make MIPS compliance easier and help you earn bonus points, which translates into increased practice income.

Some examples of orthopaedic-specific registries could include the following:

  • Medial Meniscus Tear, Acute Registry
  • Plantar Fasciitis Registry
  • Low Back Pain
  • Herniated Disc, Cervical Registry

In addition to having the ability to interact with orthopaedic-specific registries in order to  participate in ACI and improve your MIPS score, registry engagement through your EHR system will help to improve population health by collecting and reporting on data about musculoskeletal treatment effectiveness and disease trends. Public health reporting can be very complicated and time-consuming, but having an EHR system that automatically and seamlessly collects and transmits the data to the registry, without manual intervention, is a robust advantage.

Finally, access to registry data will help your practice with the Improvement Activities component of MIPS, which, during the so-called transition year of 2017, is weighted at 15% of the total MIPS score.

Jason Weisstein, MD, MPH, FACS is the Medical Director of Orthopedics at Modernizing Medicine.